May 31, 2019

Methods Efficiency Engineering


Productivity Engineering - Principle of Industrial Engineering


Industrial engineering is concerned with redesign of engineering systems with a view to improve their productivity. Industrial engineers analyze productivity of each  resource used in engineering systems and redesign as necessary to improve productivity.

It has to be ensured that the increase in productivity due to the use of low-cost materials, processes and increasing speed of machines and men, should not lead to any decrease in quality of the output.

Similarly, operators should not feel any discomfort, not have any health problems or safety issues in the redesigned more productive processes.


Methods Efficiency Engineering - Method of Industrial Engineering



In industrial engineering, there is a branch popularized as methods engineering, method study or work study. The right term for this subject should be "Methods Efficiency Engineering". Methods Engineering is the process of coming out with methods to manufacture a component, a product or to perform a service. Methods engineering is expected to come out with effective and efficient method. Industrial engineering participates in the methods engineering activity to provide efficiency related services.

Industrial engineers use analysis to find inefficiencies in proposed methods or existing ways of work and then synthesize the new method having the most efficient components and then standardize the method. It includes training workmen also. Then they develop standard times for the installed standard times.

For improving methods efficiency, industrial engineers use process efficiency analysis techniques, operation efficiency analysis techniques and motion efficiency analysis techniques.

Process efficiency analysis questions the need for every step in the analysis and looks at the possibilities for changing the sequence of operations and for combining or splitting operations further to enhance the efficiency of the process.

Operation analysis looks at each operation and resources used in the operations. It looks at the equipment used, time the equipment is utilized, the tools used, jigs and fixtures used, energy consumption, material consumption, work place layout, material handing method used, and inventory.  Motion analysis examines the motions made by the operator.



More detailed articles on methods and techniques

Process Analysis - Questions/Check List
Method Study
Operation Analysis
MOTION STUDY

Method Study - Case Studies


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Casetudy: http://www.globalresearch.com.my/main/papers/icber/PAPER_107_ImpactTime.pdf

Time and Motion Studies in Libraries http://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/5533/librarytrendsv2i3F_opt.pdf


Originally posted in Knol

Updated 15 June 2014, 15 Dec 2011


Industrial Engineering Knowledge Revision Plan - One Year Plan


January - February - March - April - May - June



July - August - September - October - November - December


Updated on 1 June 2019, 15 June 2014

Selling Process - 10 Steps

Selling Skills - Process - Article - Series




Steps in selling process




1. Prospecting

2. Call planning

3. The visit – preliminaries

4. Presentation

5. Trial close

6. Listening to the objections

7. Objection handling

8. Trial close

9. Close

10. Follow-up and service





Description and explanation of each step - Knol References




Selling Process – Prospecting

1. Prospecting

Selling Process – Prospecting
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/selling-process-prospecting.html





2. Call planning

Sales Process – Call Planning

http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/sales-process-call-planning.html



3. The visit – preliminaries

Approaching the Prospect
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/approaching-prospect.html



What should I wear for sales calls?

http://www.businesstown.com/sales/face-qa.asp

4. Presentation

http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/interacting-with-prospect-customer.html

5. Trial close

http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/trial-close.html

6. Listening to the objections

http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/prospect-objections-during-sales.html

7. Objection handling


8. Trial close
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/trial-close.html

9. Close
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/sales-closing-techniques.html

10. Follow-up and service

http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/11/service-to-customer-follow-up-after.html






Additional web references on Selling



Selling Skills: Strategies and Methods - Online Book
http://bbssob.blogspot.com/

10 greatest salesmen of all time
http://www.inc.com/ss/10-greatest-salespeople-of-all-time
Business Development Mindset:Small Business Sales Planning and Execution

http://knol.google.com/k/aline-gianfagna/business-development-mindset/2d21qdrhcu6v4/2#

_________________

Popular Posts in Marketing Management


Marketing Communication: Channels and Promotion Tools


Marketing Strategy - Marketing Process - Kotler's Description 


Marketing Strategy - Differentiating and Positioning the Market Offering


The Marketing Concept - Kotler



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Updated on 2 June 2019, 26 November 2011

Work Measurement



Work measurement is to be used to identify best way of doing an element of work. After a task is designed combining various elements the total time taken can be specified by summing up the time estimate for each element. Now predetermined time systems, the most popular being Most use this method.

Stop watch time study can be used on average trained operator to observe the time taken for each elements and from these observations standard times can be prescribed.

Measured calculated standard times of various tasks can be used to set daily task for operators.

Task based incentives can be set based on the standard time which is an output of work measurement.



Purpose of Work Measurement in Today's Industrial Situation.


Efficient methods are selected with the help of work measurement techniques when time is the most important parameter for deciding the efficiency of a method. Even if cost is the decision variable, we have to know the manpower time and machine times to calculate the cost of a method.

Optimization of plans and management decisions are done with work measurement results.


Work Measurement in Taylor's Time


One Reason was understanding the output that can be produced by a man. Taylor improved the working method, and gave rest breaks that would result in maximum output per day. But he used work measurement to find the minimum time in which a first class workman is able to do a given element of work.

F.W. Taylor came out with stop watch time technique that measured time taken for each element of an operation and systematized the work measurement procedures. Based on these time studies standard times of various work pieces were determined and fair job for the day of the worker was established using these standard times. Incentive systems were put in place to provide scope and income opportunity for production above the standard rate and also to provide motivation to reach the standard and exceed the standard.

Work Measurement - More Detail - Nadler

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Industrial Engineering Knowledge Revision Plan - One Year Plan


January - February - March - April - May - June



July - August - September - October - November - December



Updated 1 June 2019,   4 June 2016, 16 Dec 2011

Marketing Management Subject Update




Marketing Management Revision Article Series



2019

Why B2B Buying Cycles Are So Long
http://b2bmarketingdirections.blogspot.com/2019/05/why-b2b-buying-cycles-are-so-long.html

What Abraham Maslow Can Teach Us About Customer Experience
http://b2bmarketingdirections.blogspot.com/2018/07/what-abraham-maslow-can-teach-us-about.html

Marketing Communication Plan
Communication for pull. Communication for push Communication for profile.
https://neilsbrandingblog.blogspot.com/2018/10/marketing-communication-plan.html

Marketing 4.0


“Marketing 4.0: When Online Meets Offline, Style Meets Substance, and Machine-to-Machine Meets Human-to-Human” – Philip Kotler, Hermawan Kartajaya, Iwan Setiawan
May 5, 2018

Marketing 4.0 is about balancing machine-to-machine (M2M) with human-to-human (H2H).

New Ideas in Marketing 4.0

‘Segmentation and Targeting’ to ‘Customer Community Confirmation’
‘Selling the 4P’s’to ‘Commercializing the 4C’s’
‘Customer Service Processes’ to ‘Collaborative Customer Care’
‘Brand Positioning and Differentiation’ to ‘Brand Characters and Codes’
‘Segmentation and Targeting’ to ‘Customer Community Confirmation’
http://www.marketingjournal.org/marketing-4-0-when-online-meets-offline-style-meets-substance-and-machine-to-machine-meets-human-to-human-philip-kotler-hermawan-kartajaya-iwan-setiawan/


Why Great Innovation Needs Great Marketing
Denise Lee Yohn
FEBRUARY 20, 2019

Strategic, upstream marketing that is incorporated into the innovation development process can clearly define who to sell the new offering to and how to sell it.
Decide 4Ps of marketing using marketing expertise.

 Innovation alone may be enough to initiate the adoption life cycle, but marketing remains the bridge necessary to cross the chasm between early adopters to the wider group of people who will form a viable, valuable customer base.
https://hbr.org/2019/02/why-great-innovation-needs-great-marketing

4 Ways to Improve Your Content Marketing
Frank V. CespedesRuss Heddleston
APRIL 19, 2018
The average viewing time for content is 2 minutes and 27 seconds.
Frank Cespedes is a Senior Lecturer at Harvard Business School and author of Aligning Strategy and Sales (Harvard Business Review Press).
https://hbr.org/2018/04/4-ways-to-improve-your-content-marketing

Why Marketing Analytics Hasn’t Lived Up to Its Promise
Carl F. MelaChristine Moorman
MAY 30, 2018

Communication theory tells us that the transmitter and receiver of information must share a common domain of knowledge for information to be transmitted. This means analysts need to understand what the firm’s managers can understand.
 it is critical for analysts to connect externally with customers and internally with the managers using their work.
Carl F. Mela is the T. Austin Finch Foundation Professor of Marketing at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and the Executive Director at the Marketing Science Institute.
https://hbr.org/2018/05/why-marketing-analytics-hasnt-lived-up-to-its-promise



2017

5 Ways Words Can Destroy Your Marketing Messages (And How to Fix Them)
Use these copywriting tips to improve your marketing messages and ensure you don't lose sales or money on your marketing investments.
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/298766



There is No Luck. Only Good Marketing.

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TEDx Talks

Article in HBR on Organization of Marketing Department
https://hbr.org/2014/07/the-ultimate-marketing-machine

Developing a marketing plan  (interesting information is in the article)
http://canadabusiness.ca/managing-your-business/marketing-and-sales/marketing-basics/developing-a-marketing-plan/

Key competencies for general sales effectiveness
By Amir Qureshi
12 December 2016
https://www.thomasinternational.net/en-gb/blog/december-2016/key-competencies-for-general-sales-effectiveness/


Dec 2016

https://medium.com/context/tagged/best-of-2016


March 2016

Marketing Managers' Salary Guide for USA - 2016
https://www.ama.org/career/Pages/2016-Marketers-Salary-Guide.aspx

https://hbr.org/topic/marketing

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/imagine-theres-no-marketing-its-easy-if-you-try/

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/six-digital-marketing-traps-that-cmos-should-avoid/

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/small-data-new-big-data/

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/recommended-for-you-how-well-does-personalized-marketing-work/


https://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead

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TED


May 2015

Negotiation: What Makes the Right Business Deal
http://www.forbes.com/sites/ianaltman/2015/05/05/negotiation-what-makes-the-right-business-deal/


Macromarketing
I searched for this topic today in my interest to write an article on the topic marketing support for Make in India Campaign. I found that there a huge literature in the area of macromarketing. The reference I came across today are:

Marketing Theory: Philosophy of Science Perspectives
https://books.google.co.in/books?id=W4phEfAbHBQC


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macromarketing


April 2015

Marketing communication messages have to be different when you announce a product and build buying intention for it. The communication has to change when the product is actually made available in the market for purchase.  Read the summary of a recent research paper on adoption of products.
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2015/04/adoption-of-new-products-and-processes.html


February 2015
Planned Revision schedule for marketing chapters is in February and March

January 2015

Why Your Customers’ Social Identities Matter.

By: Champniss, Guy; Wilson, Hugh N.; Macdonald, Emma K. Harvard Business Review. Jan/Feb2015, Vol. 93 Issue 1/2, p88-96.

People are highly social animals. Most of us belong to many social groups, each with its own identity.

For five years the authors have been studying how social identity affects customer behavior in a wide range of industries. They have seen that companies can trigger more-favorable reactions in customers by subtly influencing which identities they tap into. This is something firms should take into account when doing market research or designing experiences.

The first step is to surface the range of  a customer's  possible identities. If a customer's identity encourages targeted behaviors, marketers can help reinforce it.  Marketers can also work to add a desired behavior to those that customers associate with an identity, prime different identities in customers, and even create new identities that deepen relationships with existing customers and attract new ones.




2014's top The Gunn Reports' Cases For Creativity

1. 1. IBM's 'A Boy And His Atom' Ogilvy & Mat her, USA
_________________

_________________
IBM upload
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/magazines/brand-equity/2014s-top-the-gunn-reports-cases-for-creativity/articleshow/45952325.cms


2. Evian Baby & Me
_________________

_________________
EvianBabies
99,261,360 views 29 Jan 2015


"Contagious: Why Things Catch on" by Jonah Berger was named the best book of Marketing of 2014
Talk by Jonah Berger
___________________

___________________
Talks at Google upload
http://google.co.in/books?id=J2l7pgwTiW4C  (For previewing the book)

Marketing News - 15 January Issue
http://publications.ama.org/Marketing_News/MN-jan15/index.html

Why Uniqlo Is Winning
By: David Aaker
Uniqlo is Japanese clothing retailer now in top 5 and plans to beat Zara.
https://www.ama.org/publications/MarketingNews/Pages/why-uniqlo-is-winning.aspx


Updated 1 June 2019. Dec 2015


Give your suggestions for adding any articles to the collection.

May 30, 2019

What is Data Science? - Evolution of Data Science

Excerpts from Global Data Science Forum What is Data Science?
By Paco Nathan posted Mon March 04, 2019
https://community.ibm.com/community/user/datascience/blogs/paco-nathan/2019/03/04/what-is-data-science

What is Data Science?

A popular 2012 tweet by Josh Wills:

Data Scientist (n.): Person who is better at statistics than any software engineer and better at software engineering than any statistician.

Data Science gained traction in industry circa 2008, just as tooling for big data was on the rise, and as business use cases for machine learning (ML) became popularized. Those three grew together in contrast to an earlier era of business intelligence (BI), which was initially popularized by Gartner analyst Howard Dresner. Most of BI was defined atop data warehouse (DW) practices, based on work by Barry Devlin and Paul Murphy, Ralph Kimball, Bill Inmon, et al. BI and DW were both introduced in the late 1980s, then became widespread practices throughout the 1990s.

Data science emerged in response to demand for more advanced techniques and larger scale-out than what the best practices from the prior decade could provide. Cloud resources were becoming popular, and crucial insights could be obtained more quickly and more cost-effectively due to popular open source tools such as Hadoop, Spark, plus a whole range of Python libraries.

In 1962, a Bell Labs mathematician named John Tukey wrote a paper called “The Future of Data Analysis”.  Tukey urged a provocative new stance for applied mathematics which he called data analysis. The interesting section headings are:

“We should seek out wholly new questions to be answered.”
“We need to tackle old problems in more realistic frameworks.”
“We should seek out unfamiliar summaries of observational material, and establish their useful properties.”
“And still more novelty can come from finding, and evading, still deeper lying constraints.”

In the  books on visualizing data by Ed Tufte, references to Tukey show up throughout most all of books.

A generation later, another Bell Labs researcher named William Cleveland coined the term data science in a 2001 paper citing Tukey among others,  “Data science: An action plan for expanding the technical areas of the field of statistics”. Cleveland proposed an outline for a multi-disciplinary curriculum:

(25%) Multidisciplinary Investigations: data analysis collaborations in a collection of subject matter areas.
(20%) Models and Methods for Data: statistical models; methods of model building; methods of estimation and distribution based on probabilistic inference.
(15%) Computing with Data: hardware systems; software systems; computational algorithms.
(15%) Pedagogy: curriculum planning and approaches to teaching for elementary school, secondary school, college, graduate school, continuing education, and corporate training.
(5%) Tool Evaluation: surveys of tools in use in practice, surveys of perceived needs for new tools, and studies of the processes for developing new tools.
(20%) Theory: foundations of data science; general approaches to models and methods, to computing with data, to teaching, and to tool evaluation; mathematical investigations of models and methods, of computing with data, of teaching, and of evaluation.

This curriculum indicates what Cleveland thought the field required, namely that data science is a space in which statistics and computing needed to interact, to provide the necessary resources and scale.

That same year, a UC Berkeley professor named Leo Breiman wrote “Statistical Modeling: The Two Cultures”. One culature is of the previous era which he called data modeling and a new trend emerging which he called algorithmic modeling. That culture of data modeling was what Tukey had argued against.  The newer culture embraced much larger data rates and more computation and also leveraged machine learning algorithms to help automate decisions at scale.

The current heyday of data science began when some of these applications which required more data started to become tractable, reliable, and cost-effective (in that order).

Check out these histories by lead architects at those firms – roughly centered on Q3 1997, which turned out to be a key inflection point for the Dot Com Boom:

“Early Amazon: Splitting the website”, Greg Linden, Amazon
“eBay Architecture”, Randy Shoup, eBay
“Inktomi’s Wild Ride”, Erik Brewer, Yahoo! Search (0:05:31 ff)
“Underneath the Covers at Google”, Jeff Dean, Google (0:06:54 ff)

The timing for those projects was during the peak of data warehouses and business intelligence adoption. However, a common theme among those four architects’ reflections is that they recognized how they’d need to scale ecommerce applications but could not do so with available tooling. Instead they turned to open source tools (such as Linux) for early data science work on proto clouds, leveraging ML at scale for ecommerce. Their timing was impeccable, particularly for Amazon: just in time to monetize the first big wave of ecommerce in the holiday season of Q4 1997. The rest is history.

The gist is that ecommerce firms split their web apps using a principle of horizontal scale out, i.e., proto cloud work on server farms. Those many servers generated lots of log files (proto Big Data), which in turn were analyzed using machine learning algorithms, which in turn provided predictive analytics that improved customer experience in the web apps. A virtuous cycle emerge, with data as a product.

However, after Q4 1997 the world of data changed, predictive analytics loomed large. Breiman described that sea change quite succinctly:

A new research community using these tools sprang up. Their goal was predictive accuracy. The community consisted of young computer scientists, physicists and engineers plus a few aging statisticians. They began using the new tools in working on complex prediction problems where it was obvious that data models were not applicable: speech recognition, image recognition, nonlinear time series prediction, handwriting recognition, prediction in financial markets.

Plenty of other people also helped further the cause of “data science” and deserve credit, such as Jeff Wu who likely coined the phrase (in its contemporary usage) during his U Michigan appointment lecture “Statistics = Data Science?”

The main takeaway from this article:

Looking at decades of history, data science found its place by applying increasingly advanced mathematics for novel business cases, in response to surges in data rates and compute resources.

In the latest wave of AI applications in industry, we have the term ABC emerging to describe a winning combo of “AI”, “Big Data”, and “Cloud Computing” – as the latest embodiment of that takeaway described above.

Beyond the well-known roles of data scientist and data engineer, there’s another important role emerging which has not yet been named. We found that 23% of the enterprise organizations attempting to leverage data science, machine learning, artificial intelligence, etc., cite recognize business use case as a critically missing skill within their teams. What would you call that role? Where and how does a person learn to perform it?

Data Science - More explanations


What is Data Science?


 In a 2009 McKinsey&Company article, Hal Varian, Google's chief economist and UC Berkeley professor of information sciences, business, and economics, predicted the importance of adapting to technology’s influence and reconfiguration of different industries. 2

“The ability to take data — to be able to understand it, to process it, to extract value from it, to visualize it, to communicate it — that’s going to be a hugely important skill in the next decades.”
https://datascience.berkeley.edu/about/what-is-data-science/

Chapter 1. Introduction: What Is Data Science?
Doing Data Science by Rachel Schutt, Cathy O'Neil
https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/doing-data-science/9781449363871/ch01.html

Data Science vs. Big Data vs. Data Analytics
By Shivam Arora
Jan 4, 2019
https://www.simplilearn.com/data-science-vs-big-data-vs-data-analytics-article

Oracle Artificial Intelligence (AI)—What Is Data Science?
An elaborate article giving many details of data science and related issues.


Earlier Articles

What is Data Science? - An Introduction to Data Science

Data Science - Online Study Notes and Video Courses - Free Also

Data Analytics and Data Mining - Difference Explained


Updated on 31 May 2019, 26 May 2019

Peter Drucker on Scientific Management - Industrial Engineering

"Scientific management is our most widely practised personnel management concept" said Peter Drucker in his book The Practice of Management. The concepts of scientific management underlie the actual management of worker and work in American Industry.

"Scientific management is our most widely practised personnel management concept" said Peter Drucker in his book The Practice of Management. The concepts of scientific management underlie the actual management of worker and work in American Industry. The core of scientific management is the organized study of work, the analysis of work into its simplest elements and the systematic improvement or design of each of these elements. Drucker emphasized that scientific management has both basic concepts and easily applicable tools and techniques to carry out it intended job. Its contribution is visible in the form of higher readily measurable output.

Scientific management is a systematic philosophy of worker and work. As long as industrial society endures, we will not forget the insight that human work can be studied systematically, can be analyzed, can be improved by work on its elementary parts. Scientific management was a great liberating and pioneering insight. Without it a real study of human beings at work would not have been possible. Scientific management or industrial engineering has penetrated the entire world. Yet is has been stagnant for a long time. From 1890 to 1920 Scientific Management produced one brilliant insight after the other and creative thinkers like Taylor, Gantt and Gilbreths. During the last thirty years, it has given us little. There are exceptions like Mrs Lillian Gilbreth and the Late Harry Hopf.

According to Drucker, the lack of progress is due to two blind spots. One was the thinking that each element has to be done by one worker. Taylor saw the need to integrate and Harry Hopf certainly advocated it. According to Drucker, IE has not provided good integration tools or concepts, both individual elements and the special qualities of each man.

The second blind spot according to Drucker is insistence on divorce of planning and doing.

Drucker concluded his discussion of the topic with the statement, 'We must preserve the fundamental insights of Scientific Management - just as we must preserve those of Human Relations. But we must go beyond the traditional application of Scientific Management, must learn to see where it has been blind. And the coming of the new technology makes this task doubly urgent."


Functions and Focus Areas of Industrial Engineering formulated from a fresh statement of principles of industrial engineering. The fundamental insights of scientific management and human relations approaches are integrated by Narayana Rao.

References

Peter Drucker in his book The Practice of Management, First Edition, 1955, Current Print 2006, Butterworth Heinemann, .pp.273-281


Industrial Engineering Knowledge Revision Plan - One Year Plan


January - February - March - April - May - June



July - August - September - October - November - December

Updated on 31 May 2019, 2 May 2019

Orlicky's Material Requirements Planning, Third Edition by: Carol Ptak, Chad Smith - Book Information




Orlicky's Material Requirements Planning, Third Edition

by: Carol Ptak, Chad Smith

Preview the book in Google Books https://books.google.com/books?id=lRsULeiVTroC

A fully revised and updated edition of the landmark work on material requirements planning (MRP), Orlicky's Material Requirements Planning, Third Edition focuses on the new rules required to effectively support a manufacturing operation using MRP systems in the twenty-first century. This authoritative resource offers proven solutions that help you gain the competitive edge through strategic lead time reductions, substantial reductions in total inventory investment, and significant increases in service levels.

Building on the pioneering work of Joseph Orlicky, this new edition of the classic text on material requirements planning (MRP) reveals the next evolutionary step for materials and supply chain synchronization in the modern manufacturing landscape.

Orlicky's Material Requirements Planning, Third Edition  explains an alternative pull structure for planning and controlling materials flow, and presents results from actual implementations. This thoroughly updated edition offers comprehensive coverage of MRP, describes the current state of the MRP application, and identifies the fundamental changes required to achieve sustainable success given the current global circumstances and technology options. This state-of-the art guide articulates the next generation of MRP logic—demand driven MRP (DDMRP)—and provides a roadmap for the near and distant future for this critical manufacturing management tool.



Table of Contents

A. About the Authors
B. Foreword
C. Preface
1. Overview
2. MRP in the Modern World
3. The Four Critical Questions Answered
4. Inventory in a Manufacturing Environment
5. Principles of Materials Requirements Planning
6. The Material Requirements Planning System
7. Processing Logic
8. Lot Sizing
9. System Records and Files
10. A New Way of Looking at Things
11. Product Definition
12. Master Production Schedule
13. More Than an Inventory Control System
14. System Effectiveness: A Function of Design and Use
15. Industry Effect on MRP
16. Project Manufacturing
17. Remanufacturing
18. Process Industry Application
19. Repetitive Manufacturing Application
20. Sales and Operations Planning
21. Historical Context
22. Blueprint for the Future: Demand-Driven MRP Logic
23. Strategic Inventory Positioning
24. Buffer Profiles and Level Determination
25. Dynamic Buffers
26. Demand-Driven Planning
27. Highly Visible and Collaborative Execution
28. Demand-Driven Material Requirements Planning (DDMRP) Performance Reporting and Analytics
29. DDMRP Future
A. Joseph Orlicky's Contributions to Material Requirements Planning
B. Definitions: APICS Terms and Their Place in DDMRP
C. New Terms in Demand-Driven Material Requirements Planning
D. To My Best Recollection: The Eras of Material Requirements Planning with Packaged Software
Tools & Media
figure (283)
table (12)
graph (2)



Expanded Table of Contents

A. About the Authors
B. Foreword
C. Preface
SCOPE FOR THIS EDITION
ABOUT THE COLLABORATION
1. Overview
ORLICKY'S VISION
FOCUS AND ORGANIZATION OF THIS BOOK
BIBLIOGRAPHY

2. MRP in the Modern World
KEY QUESTIONS FOR PLANNING AND FLEXIBILITY
DEALING WITH VARIABILITY
MATERIALS OR CAPACITY: WHERE TO FOCUS FIRST?

3. The Four Critical Questions Answered
QUESTION 1: RELEVANCE OF MRP
QUESTION 2: MRP—FLAWED APPROACH OR POORLY APPLIED?
QUESTION 3: THE MRP CONFLICT WITH LEAN OR PULL
QUESTION 4: MRP PROGRESS IN THE LAST 30 YEARS?

4. Inventory in a Manufacturing Environment
MANUFACTURING INVENTORIES
DISTRIBUTION INVENTORY
THE LOGIC OF MANUFACTURING
ORDER-POINT VERSUS MRP SYSTEMS
THE PARADOX OF INVENTORY MANAGEMENT
A DISTRIBUTION POSITIONING EXAMPLE
SUMMARY
BIBLIOGRAPHY

5. Principles of Materials Requirements Planning
TIME PHASING
INVENTORY SYSTEM CATEGORIES
PREREQUISITES AND ASSUMPTIONS OF MRP
PART NUMBERS
BILLS OF MATERIAL (BOMS)
APPLICABILITY OF MRP METHODS
BIBLIOGRAPHY

6. The Material Requirements Planning System
OBJECTIVES OF THE SYSTEM
THE PURPOSE OF THE SYSTEM
SYSTEM INPUTS AND OUTPUTS
FACTORS AFFECTING THE COMPUTATION OF REQUIREMENTS

7. Processing Logic
INVENTORY STATUS
TECHNIQUES OF TIME PHASING
GROSS AND NET REQUIREMENTS
COVERAGE OF NET REQUIREMENTS
EXPLOSION OF REQUIREMENTS
TIME-PHASED ORDER POINT
ENTRY OF EXTERNAL-ITEM DEMAND
SYSTEM NERVOUSNESS
BIBLIOGRAPHY

8. Lot Sizing
COSTS IN LOT SIZING
LOT-SIZING TECHNIQUES
LOT-SIZE ADJUSTMENTS
EVALUATING LOT-SIZING TECHNIQUES
BIBLIOGRAPHY

9. System Records and Files
THE TIME-PHASED RECORD
UPDATING INVENTORY RECORDS
THE DATABASE
INPUT-DATA INTEGRITY
BIBLIOGRAPHY

10. A New Way of Looking at Things
PLANNED VERSUS ACTUAL MANUFACTURING LEAD TIME
SAFETY STOCK IN A NEW LIGHT
A FRESH LOOK AT QUEUES
WORK-IN-PROCESS REVISITED
TOTAL PLANNING HIERARCHY
BIBLIOGRAPHY

11. Product Definition
ASSIGNMENT OF IDENTITIES TO INVENTORY ITEMS
PRODUCT MODEL DESIGNATIONS
MODULAR BILLS OF MATERIAL
PSEUDO-BOMS
INTERFACE TO ORDER ENTRY
BIBLIOGRAPHY

12. Master Production Schedule
MASTER PRODUCTION SCHEDULING CONCEPTS
THE FINAL ASSEMBLY SCHEDULE
FUNCTIONS OF MASTER PRODUCTION SCHEDULING
MPS DEVELOPMENT
CLOSING THE LOOP
MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS
BIBLIOGRAPHY

13. More Than an Inventory Control System
USE OF SYSTEM OUTPUTS
AN INVENTORY PLANNING AND CONTROL SYSTEM
A PRIORITY PLANNING SYSTEM
DETERMINING CAPACITY REQUIREMENTS

14. System Effectiveness: A Function of Design and Use
CRITICAL SYSTEM DESIGN FEATURES
THE SYSTEM AND THE INVENTORY PLANNER

15. Industry Effect on MRP
PROJECT MANUFACTURING COMPANY
MAKE TO STOCK
MAKE TO ORDER
ASSEMBLE TO ORDER
MAKE TO STOCK/ASSEMBLE TO ORDER

16. Project Manufacturing
PROJECT LIFE CYCLES
PROJECTS IN MRP
CAPACITY DEPLOYMENT
MATERIAL ALLOCATION
SUMMARY
PROJECT MANAGEMENT RESOURCES

17. Remanufacturing
REMANUFACTURING SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES
MANAGING REMANUFACTURING MATERIAL
REMANUFACTURING BILLS OF MATERIALS
REMANUFACTURING ROUTINGS
REMANUFACTURING INVENTORY MANAGEMENT
TERMS RELATED TO THE REMANUFACTURING INDUSTRY1

18. Process Industry Application
PROCESS INDUSTRY OVERVIEW
PROCESS-FLOW SCHEDULING
MRP SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
SUMMARY

19. Repetitive Manufacturing Application
GENERAL REPETITIVE APPLICATION
KANBAN
RATE-BASED SCHEDULING
PRODUCTION-SALES-INVENTORY ANALYSIS
BACKFLUSH
PERIOD COSTING
HIGH-VOLUME MIXED-MODEL MANUFACTURING
CONFIGURATORS
SUMMARY

20. Sales and Operations Planning
WHAT'S IN A NAME?
TRADITIONAL SALES AND OPERATIONS PLANNING
S&OP, THE UNIFIER—TRADITIONAL S&OP CHALLENGED
S&OP, THE RECONCILER AND INTEGRATOR
KNOWLEDGE AND KNOW-HOW VERSUS DROWNING IN DATA
UNCERTAINTY VERSUS A SINGLE SET OF NUMBERS
S&OP AS THE ALIGNER TO SUCCESS AND FUTURE SUSTAINABILITY
DISCOVERIES LEADING TO BREAKTHROUGH S&OP
APPLICATION OF S&OP TO VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTS
SUMMARY
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
BIBLIOGRAPHY

21. Historical Context
PRE-MRP INVENTORY CONTROL
THE STORY OF MRP
EVOLUTION OF THE ART
EVOLUTION OF MRP AND PLANNING SYSTEMS
PLANNING, EXECUTION, AND CONTROL

22. Blueprint for the Future: Demand-Driven MRP Logic
THE MRP CONFLICT
DEMAND-DRIVEN MRP INTRODUCTION
THE FIVE PRIMARY COMPONENTS OF DEMAND-DRIVEN MRP

23. Strategic Inventory Positioning
ASR LEAD TIME: A NEW TYPE OF LEAD TIME
ASRLT AND MATRIX BOMS
24. Buffer Profiles and Level Determination
INVENTORY: ASSET OR LIABILITY REVISITED
BUFFER PROFILES
BUFFER ZONES
CALCULATING BUFFER LEVELS
BUFFER LEVEL SUMMARY
SUMMARY
25. Dynamic Buffers
RECALCULATED ADJUSTMENTS
PLANNED ADJUSTMENTS
MANUAL ADJUSTMENTS
26. Demand-Driven Planning
PART PLANNING DESIGNATIONS
THE DDMRP PROCESS
SUPPLY GENERATION FOR STOCKED ITEMS
SUPPLY GENERATION FOR NONSTOCKED ITEMS
DECOUPLED EXPLOSION
27. Highly Visible and Collaborative Execution
CHALLENGING PRIORITY BY DUE DATE
BUFFER STATUS ALERTS
SYNCHRONIZATION ALERTS
EXECUTION COLLABORATION
28. Demand-Driven Material Requirements Planning (DDMRP) Performance Reporting and Analytics
OREGON FREEZE DRY RESULTS
LETOURNEAU TECHNOLOGIES RESULTS
29. DDMRP Future
RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES
PREDICTION OF THE FUTURE
SUCCESS LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY
A. Joseph Orlicky's Contributions to Material Requirements Planning
B. Definitions: APICS Terms and Their Place in DDMRP
C. New Terms in Demand-Driven Material Requirements Planning
D. To My Best Recollection: The Eras of Material Requirements Planning with Packaged Software
Book Details
Title: Orlicky's Material Requirements Planning, Third Edition

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Lisbon, London, Madrid, Mexico City, Milan, New Delhi, San Juan, Seoul, Singapore, Sydney, Toronto

Copyright / Pub. Date: 2011 McGraw-Hill Education, LLC

ISBN: 9780071755634

Authors:

Carol Ptak is currently a partner with the Demand Driven Institute, and was most recently at Pacific Lutheran University as Visiting Professor and Distinguished Executive in Residence. Previously, she was vice president and global industry executive for manufacturing and distribution industries at PeopleSoft where she developed the concept of demand driven manufacturing (DDM). Ms. Ptak spent four years at IBM Corporation culminating in the position of global SMB segment executive.

Chad Smith is cofounder and managing partner of Constraints Management Group, a services and technology company specializing in pull-based manufacturing, materials, and project management systems for mid-range and large manufacturers. He has been at the forefront of developing and articulating demand driven MRP and is also an internationally recognized expert on the theory of constraints (TOC) Carol and Chad founded the Demand Driven Institute, an organization devoted to the proliferation and further development of demand driven strategies and tactics in industry.


May 29, 2019

Philip Kotler's Lectures, Presentations and Interviews on Marketing



“Leadership and the Public Good” – An Interview with Philip Kotler
January 15, 2019

Sep 12, 2018
Northwestern Professor Philip Kotler On What's Next For Marketing

“Marketing 4.0” – A Podcast Interview with Philip Kotler

December 13, 2016
http://www.marketingjournal.org/marketing-4-0-a-podcast-interview-with-phil-kotler/


Philip Kotler: Future of business is doing good (and the four Ps are safe)

_______________

_______________
Marketing Magazine
Uploaded 22 Feb 2015

Marketing 1.0  -Rational appeal to consumers.
Marketing 2.0 - Emotional appeal to consumers
Marketing 3.0 - Think of consumer segment who cannot buy your present product. Think of cost reduction of the product and serve those sections out of philanthrophic feelings.


The Thinker Interview with Philip Kotler, the Father of Marketing

With the rise of the internet and the advent of new concepts like social media, e-commerce and digital marketing, critics started questioning the relevance of the classic Four Ps model of marketing. Yet Kotler chooses to staunchly defend the concept
BY NEELIMA MAHAJAN
Jan 29, 2014
http://www.forbesindia.com/article/ckgsb/the-thinker-interview-with-philip-kotler-the-father-of-marketing/36951/1

The Larger Context for Social Marketing
Marketing for Planned Social Change
________________

________________
World Social Marketing upload
2013




The Larger Context for Social Marketing

Social marketing is one of six social change strategies. To be maximally effective, social marketers must work with other social change strategies. Social marketers must tie their work to new technologies that become available and also tie their work to current and emerging
social movements. The addition of upstream and mid-stream social marketing thinking is enriching the power of social marketers to more effectively bring about behavioral change, its main objective.


Updated on 30 May 2019, 17 February 2016

Marketing Strategy - Differentiating and Positioning the Market Offering





Marketing Strategy

 
Philip Kotler discussed five issues of marketing strategy in his Marketing Management

Differentiating and Positioning the Market Offering


Managing Life cycle Strategies

Designing marketing Strategies for Market Leaders, Challengers, Followers, and Niches



   
These issues are covered in different articles  by me in  Management Theory Revision


This article  describes differentiating and positioning. 
 
Differentiating and Positioning the Market Offering



The issues discussed in the area of differentiating and Positioning the market offering are:

  • Tools for Competitive Differentiation
  • Developing a Positioning Strategy
  • Communicating the Company’s Positioning

Tools for Competitive Differentiation

Differentiation - Definition: is the act of designing a set of meaningful differences to distinguish the company's offering from competitor's offerings.



Boston Consulting Group's differentiation opportunities matrix: Actually it is a competitive advantage matrix applicable to differentiation opportunities. 

Four types of industries identified by BCG matrix are:



Volume industry: only a few but very large competitive advantages are possible. The benefit of the advantage is proportional with company size and market share. Example given - construction industry.



Stalemated industry: in this type there are only few opportunities and the benefit from each is small. The benefit is also not proportional to the size or market share.


Example: Steel industry - It is hard to differentiate the product or decrease its manufacturing cost.


Fragmented industry: in this type, there are many opportunities, but the benefit of each of them is small. Benefit does not depend on size or market share.

Specialized industry: in this type, the opportunities are more and benefit of each opportunity is high. The benefit is not related to size or market share.

Kotler mentions, Milind Lele's observation that companies differ in their potential maneuverability along five dimensions: their target market, product, place (channels), promotion, and price. The freedom of maneuver is affected by the industry structure and the firm's position in the industry. For each potential competitive opportunity or option limited by the maneuverability, the company needs to estimate the return. Those opportunities that promise the highest return define the company's strategic leverage. The concept of maneuverability brings out the fact that a strategic option that worked very well in one industry may not work equally well in the other industry because of low maneuverability of that option in the different industry and by the firm in consideration.

Five Dimensions of Differentiation



Regarding the tools of differentiation, five dimensions can be utilized to provide differentiation.



Product

Services that accompany marketing, sales and after sales services.

Personnel that interact with the customer

Channel

Image

 
Differentiating a Product


Features


Quality:  performance and conformance

Performance - the performance of the prototype or the exhibited sample,
Conformance - The performance of every item made by the company under the same specification

Durability

Reliability

Repairability

Style

Design


Services differentiation



Ordering ease

Delivery

Installation

Customer training

Customer consulting

Miscellaneous services


Personnel Differentiation

Competence

Courtesy

Credibility
Reliability
Responsiveness
Communication

Channel differentiation
Coverage
Expertise of the channel managers
Performance of the channel in ease of ordering, and service, and personnel

Image differentiation
First distinction between Identity and Image - Identity is designed by the company and through its various actions company tries to make it known to the market.
Image is the understanding and view of the market about the company.
An effective image does three things for a product or company.
1. It establishes the product's planned character and value proposition.
2. It distinguishes the product from competing products.
3. It delivers emotional power and stirs the hearts as well as the minds of buyers.
The identity of the company or product is communicated to the market by
Symbols
Written and audiovisual media
Atmosphere of the physical place with which customer comes into contact
Events organized or sponsored by the company.
 

Developing a Positioning Strategy

Levitt and others have pointed out dozens of ways to differentiate an offering(Theodore Levitt: "Marketing success through differentiation-of anything", Harvard Business Review, Jan-Feb, 1980)


While a company can create many differences, each difference created has a cost as well as consumer benefit. A difference is worth establishing when the benefit exceeds the cost. More generally, a difference is worth establishing to the extent that it satisfies the following criteria.

  
Important: The difference delivers a highly valued benefit to a sufficient number of buyers.


Distinctive: The difference either isn't offered by others or is offered in a more distinctive way by the company.


Superior: The difference is superior to the ways of obtaining the same benefit.


Communicable: The difference is communicable and visible to the buyers.


Preemptive: The difference cannot be easily copied by competitors.


Affordable: The buyer can afford to pay the higher price


Profitable: The Company will make profit by introducing the difference.



Positioning  
Positioning is the result of differentiation decisions. It is the act of designing the company's offering and identity (that will create a planned image) so that they occupy a meaningful and distinct competitive position in the target customer's minds.

The end result of positioning is the creation of a market-focused value proposition, a simple clear statement of why the target market should buy the product.


Example:

Volvo (station wagon)
Target customer-Safety conscious upscale families,
Benefit - Durability and Safety,
Price - 20% premium,
Value proposition - The safest, most durable wagon in which your family can ride.



How many differences to promote?

Many marketers advocate promoting only one benefit in the market (Your market offering may have many differentiators, actually should have many differentiators in product, service, personnel, channel, and image).


Kotler mentions that double benefit promotion may be necessary, if some more firms claim to be best on the same attribute. Kotler gives the example of Volvo, which says and "safest" and "durable".


Four major positioning errors
1. Underpositioning: Market only has a vague idea of the product.

2. Overpositioning: Only a narrow group of customers identify with the product.

3. Confused positioning: Buyers have a confused image of the product as it claims too many benefits or it changes the claim too often.

4. Doubtful positioning: Buyers find it difficult to believe the brand’s claims in view of the product’s features, price, or manufacturer.


Different positioning strategies or themes
1. Attribute positioning: The message highlights one or two of the attributes of the product.

2. Benefit positioning:  The message highlights one or two of the benefits to the customer.

3. Use/application positioning: Claim the product as best for some application.

4. User positioning: Claim the product as best for a group of users. - Children, women, working women etc.

5. Competitor positioning: Claim that the product is better than a competitor.

6. Product category positioning: Claim as the best in a product category Ex: Mutual fund ranks – Lipper.

7. Quality/Price positioning: Claim best value for price

Which differences to promote:



This issue is related to the discussion of worthwhile differences to incorporate into the market offering done earlier. But now competitors positioning also needs to be considered to highlight one or two exclusive benefits offered by the product under consideration.



 
Communicating the Company’s Positioning


Once the company has developed a clear positioning strategy, the company must choose various signs and cues that buyers use to confirm that the product delivers the promise made by the company.

References

Philip Kotler - Marketing Management



Management Articles and Concepts Directory

Planned Revision schedule for marketing chapters is in February and March

Most Popular Online Articles by Narayana Rao
Management Theory Review Blog  http://nraomtr.blogspot.com



Updated 30 May 2019, 26 November 2011




Philip Kotler on Digital Marketing




Marketing Management Revision Article Series





The Internet is having an impact today that is comparable to what the world felt when Gutenberg introduced the idea of printing.  The Internet, social media and new communication technologies are major game changers in marketing.  The company cannot promote its brand by having a monopoly on communications about its brands.  It is the consumers and their peer-to-peer talk that is shaping consumer images of brands and what to buy and how much to pay.  No Company can afford to deceive customers without being quickly exposed on the Internet.


New digital  technologies affect all of the 4Ps of marketing. The advent of 3D Printing will help entrepreneurs design new products cheaper and faster.  The development of software to do dynamic pricing will allow airlines to change the price of seats depending on the number of seats already sold. The development of new distribution channels such as online seller, Amazon and others,  and eBay are increasing the ease of transacting.  The development of social media technologies such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are changing marketing tools for promotion.



Traditional advertising will contribute to be a brand builder but it will have to do it with a lower budget.  Some percentage of every company's advertising budget will have to move into digital and social media marketing.  It may conceivably in five or more years rise to 50 percent.  Traditional advertising will increasingly partner with digital marketing, one supporting the other in a synergistic way.

Company Moves to use Digital Marketing Opportunity

1. Companies will increasingly resort to crowdsourcing to get ideas for new products, new advertising campaigns, and new sales promotion ideas.

2. Companies will increasingly move to marketing automation where they use artificial intelligence to carry out marketing activities that were formerly done by skilled marketers.

3. Companies will increasingly learn how to produce “lovemarks” with their customers and employees.

http://etalks.me/philip-kotler-marketing-for-better-world/


Edition  15 of Marketing Management by Kotler and Keller on Digital Marketing



New trends in marketing are co-creation, crowd-sourcing, sustainability, dynamic pricing, digital marketing, marketing automation, and growth strategies. Many of these are based on digital technologies.

Online Marketing Communication and Promotional Opportunities


Web Sites
Microsites
Search ads
Display ads
Interstitials
Internet-specific ads and videos
Sponsorships
Alliances and affiliate programs
Online communities
Email
Mobile marketing



Web Sites


Visitors will visit sites based on their need and judge a site's performance on ease of use and physical attractiveness. The physical attractiveness depends on typefaces, fonts and good use of color and sound. The statistics of visitors to various sites are collected by some agencies.

People have to be aware of the web site of an organization to visit it. For facilitating it, companies advertise their web site in all their communications. But the general practice now, is for people to use search engines to find the specific web site or web sites related to topics they want to visit. Hence search engine optimization has to be done by the company to get its web site included in the search results for more number of search terms. Search engine optimization (SEO) has become an important area in interactive marketing.

Key Design Elements of Effective Web Sites


Rayport and Jaworski propose that effective sites feature seven design elements they call 7Cs.

Context: Layout and design
Content: Text, pictures, sound, video
Community: User-to-user communication
Customization: Site’s personalization ability
Communication: Site-user communication
Connection: Links to other sites
Commerce: Ability to conduct transactions

Microsite


Microsite is a site within the site of another related organization. For example, a vehicle insurance company can have a microsite on the website of a vehicle seller. Microsites can be sites paid for by an external advertiser/company. This explanation was given in the 13th Edition. In the oods/products classification, there is a category of unsought products. People do not visit websites of unsought products. Therefore microsites of unsought products can be hosted on websites of products in demand to gain the attention of the consumer.

Online Advertisements

The two major categories are Search Ads and Display Ads.

Search Ads

Search ads has a dominating marketing share today.Along with the general search results, search engines show some sites which pay money for it. This is the search ad feature. The average click through rates for search ads is estimated to be 2% and marketers are happy with this response and the cost of search advertising which is given as 35 cents per click. Google adwords is search ads program and people are specializing in finding out and bidding for key words that have better consumer responses.

Display Ads

In the early days of internet, banner ads had click rates of 2 to 3 percent. But very quickly the click through rates plummeted. Kotler and Keller give the opinion that display ads still hold great promise. But ads need to be more attention-getting.

YouTube Video Marketing


YouTube videos are popular as internet specific videos. Many brands are using YouTube to post videos having advertisement content and they are having very good number of views sometimes in millions.

Sponsorships
Internet content can be sponsored.

Alliances and Affiliate Programmes
The most popular ones are Google Adsense and Amazon affiliate programe

Online Communities
Nestle has 750 Facebook pages covering its various brands.

Email Marketing
e-Marketing Guidelines

Give the customer a reason to respond
Personalize the content of your emails
Offer something the customer could not get via direct mail
Make it easy for customers to unsubscribe


Social Media


Social Media Success Case: Dollar Shave Club


The video that went viral and got 12000 subscribers.
Uploaded on 6 March 2012
Now 26 million+ views
___________

___________


Website:  https://www.dollarshaveclub.com/

8 Content Marketing Tricks That Helped Dollar Shave Club Go Viral
Last Updated on March 26, 2019
https://www.quicksprout.com/content-marketing-tricks-that-helped-dollar-shave-club-go-viral/

Same content in another page:
https://cubatica.com/how-dollar-shave-club-soared-to-a-140-million-marketing-budget-in-just-five-years/

CMO Adam Weber’s View: How Dollar Shave Club built its brand on video marketing
As the company's first marketing employee, Adam Weber now serves as Dollar Shave Club's CMO, leading the brand's video marketing strategy.
July 20, 2016
https://marketingland.com/cmos-view-adam-weber-dollar-shave-club-video-marketing-184234

Mobile Marketing


Mobile is being now used to access internet and do transactions like booking tickets and online shopping. There are more than twice as many mobile phones in the world as personal computers. Mobile presents an opportunity to marketers to reach a big audience and also to reach them at more opportune time. Mobile advertising has already crossed $1 billion level and established itself as a viable advertising option. But the screen size being small, advertisers have to develop designs that are appealing and ease to users.

Marketing 4.0: Moving from Traditional to Digital



Marketing 4.0 is about balancing machine-to-machine (M2M) with human-to-human (H2H).

New Ideas in Marketing 4.0


‘Segmentation and Targeting’ to ‘Customer Community Confirmation’
‘Selling the 4P’s’to ‘Commercializing the 4C’s’
‘Customer Service Processes’ to ‘Collaborative Customer Care’
‘Brand Positioning and Differentiation’ to ‘Brand Characters and Codes’
‘Segmentation and Targeting’ to ‘Customer Community Confirmation’

Book

Marketing 4.0: Moving from Traditional to Digital


Philip Kotler, Hermawan Kartajaya, Iwan Setiawan
John Wiley & Sons, 05-Dec-2016 - Business & Economics - 208 pages

Marketing has changed forever—this is what comes next

Marketing 4.0: Moving from Traditional to Digital,  written by the world's leading marketing authorities, helps you navigate the increasingly connected world and changing consumer landscape to reach more customers, more effectively. Today's customers have less time and attention to devote to your brand—and they are surrounded by alternatives every step of the way. You need to stand up, get their attention, and deliver the message they want to hear. This book examines the marketplace's shifting power dynamics, the paradoxes wrought by connectivity, and the increasing sub-culture splintering that will shape tomorrow's consumer; this foundation shows why Marketing 4.0 is becoming imperative for productivity, and this book shows you how to apply it to your brand today.

Marketing 4.0 takes advantage of the shifting consumer mood to reach more customers and engage them more fully than ever before. Exploit the changes that are tripping up traditional approaches, and make them an integral part of your methodology. This book gives you the world-class insight you need to make it happen.

Discover the new rules of marketing
Stand out and create WOW moments
Build a loyal and vocal customer base
Learn who will shape the future of customer choice

Every few years brings a "new" marketing movement, but experienced marketers know that this time its different; it's not just the rules that have changed, it's the customers themselves. Marketing 4.0 provides a solid framework based on a real-world vision of the consumer as they are today, and as they will be tomorrow. Marketing 4.0 gives you the edge you need to reach them more effectively than ever before.
https://books.google.co.in/books?id=jN9mDQAAQBAJ

Marketing 4.0: Moving from Traditional to Digital - A Reading Review
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/marketing-40-moving-from-traditional-digital-reading-aziza-amri

“Marketing 4.0” – A Podcast Interview with Philip Kotler
December 13, 2016
http://www.marketingjournal.org/marketing-4-0-a-podcast-interview-with-phil-kotler/

What Is The Future Of Digital Marketing?

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesagencycouncil/2018/03/28/what-is-the-future-of-digital-marketing


Marketing 4.0: Enhancing Consumer-Brand Engagement through Big Data Analysis

How big data can be used to enhance the consumer-brand relationship.


Ana Isabel Jiménez-Zarco (Open University of Catalonia, Spain), Asher Rospigliosi (Brighton University, UK), María Pilar Martínez-Ruiz (University of Castilla la Mancha, Spain) and Alicia Izquierdo-Yusta (University of Burgos, Spain)
Source Title: Socio-Economic Perspectives on Consumer Engagement and Buying Behavior
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 24

Abstract
Marketing evolves in parallel with technology. Growing research is focusing on Marketing 4.0: the marketing of big data.  Taking into account how consumers' behavior has been changing since the beginning of this century, this chapter seeks to review Marketing 4.0 concepts, analyzing how big data can be used to enhance the consumer-brand relationship.

Updated on 30 May 2019, 2 May 2019