December 31, 2017

MBA Core Management Knowledge - One Year Revision Schedule


The blog contains articles on all management subjects developed using the most popular book on the subject. You can read articles on the sybject of your choice or use the following schedule.


One Year MBA Knowledge Revision Plan

Revision Schedule


Current Month -  April  


January  - February  - March  - April  - May   -   June

July       - August     - September  - October  - November  - December


Subject Details of Each Month



January  (Principles of Management) - February (P.of M & Marketing Management from 23 Feb 2015 )
March (Mktg. Mgmt. & Operations Management from 17 March 2015)  -
April  (Supply Chain Management and Financial & Cost Accounting)

May  (Management Accounting & Organizational Behavior)  -
June (Innovation, Industrial Engineering and Economics)

July  (Economics, Engineering Economics, & Managerial Ethics)   - August    (Statistics, Quality and Six Sigma, OR & BRM)

September (HRM, Mentoring, Training, Maintenance, Energy & Environment Management)  -  October  (Information Technology and Management Information Systems, Logistics - Warehousing and Transport)

November (Strategic Management & Financial Management)  - December (Business Laws, Negotiation, Taxes and Government Relations)

Subject                                               Revision Period

Principles of Management                15 January   to   19 February

Marketing Management                    22 February to   16 March

Operations Management                   17 March     to    2 April

Supply Chain Management                 3 April       to  15 April

Financial & Cost Accounting            16 April       to  12 May




I am participating in April A to Z Blogging Challenge and I am writing on the theme Top Management Challenges.

Top Management Challenges.


Article 1: Awareness of Environment
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2017/04/awareness-of-environment.html




Updated 1 April 2017.  22 February 2017,  10 December 2015




April 30, 2017

Supply Chain Management Revision Articles with Links

3 April to 5 April 2016


Understanding the Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/understanding-supply-chain.html
Supply Chain Performance: Achieving Strategic Fit: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/supply-chain-performance-achieving.html

Supply Chain Drivers and Obstacles - Review Notes: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/supply-chain-drivers-and-obstacles.html
Designing the Distribution Network in a Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/designing-distribution-network-in.html


Facility Decisions: Network Design in the Supply Chain:  http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/network-design-in-supply-chain.html
Network Design in an Uncertain Environment: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/network-design-in-uncertain-environment.html

2nd Week

8 April to 12 April 2016


Demand Forecasting in a Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/demand-forecasting-in-supply-chain.html
Aggregate Planning in the Supply Chain - Review Notes:
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/aggregate-planning-in-supply-chain.html

Planning Supply and Demand in the Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/planning-supply-and-demand-in-supply.html
Managing Economies of Scale in the Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/managing-economies-of-scale-in-supply.html

Managing Uncertainty in the Supply Chain: Safety Inventory:
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/managing-uncertainty-in-supply-chain.html
Determining Optimal Level of Product Availability:
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/determining-optimal-level-of-product.html

Sourcing Decisions in a Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/sourcing-decisions-in-supply-chain.html
Transportation in the Supply Chain - Chopra and Meindl:
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/transportation-in-supply-chain.html

Pricing and Revenue Management in the Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/pricing-and-revenue-management-in.html
Coordination in the Supply Chain - Review Notes:
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/coordination-in-supply-chain-review.html

3rd Week

15 April 


Information Technology and the Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/information-technology-and-supply-chain.html
e-business and the Supply Chain: http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/e-business-and-supply-chain-review.html




View Twitter for latest in Supply Chain
https://twitter.com/hashtag/Supplychain?src=hash

April - Management Knowledge Revision



______________




















______________


1 April to 5 April 2016


Material Requirements Planning - Review Notes
Operations Scheduling - Review Notes


Financial Analysis - Review Notes
Operations Technology - Review Notes

Supply Chain Management

 3rd April 2016


Understanding the Supply Chain
Supply Chain Performance: Achieving Strategic Fit

Supply Chain Drivers and Obstacles - Review Notes
Designing the Distribution Network in a Supply Chain


Facility Decisions: Network Design in the Supply Chain
Network Design in an Uncertain Environment

2nd Week

8 April to 12 April 2016


Demand Forecasting in a Supply Chain
Aggregate Planning in the Supply Chain - Review Notes

Planning Supply and Demand in the Supply Chain
Managing Economies of Scale in the Supply Chain

Managing Uncertainty in the Supply Chain: Safety Inventory
Determining Optimal Level of Product Availability

Sourcing Decisions in a Supply Chain
Transportation in the Supply Chain - Chopra and Meindl

Pricing and Revenue Management in the Supply Chain
Coordination in the Supply Chain - Review Notes

3rd Week

15 April to 19 April 


Information Technology and the Supply Chain
e-business and the Supply Chain


Financial Accounting


Accounting: The Language of Business
Recording Transactions - Review Notes

Accrual Accounting  - Revision
Measuring Income to Assess Performance and Balance Sheet - Review Notes

Detailed Accounting Procedures

Accounting for Sales - Review Notes
Inventories and Cost of Goods Sold - Review Notes

Long-Lived Assets and Depreciation - Review Notes
Liabilities and Interest - Review Notes

4th Week

22 April to 26 April 2016



Statement of Cash Flows - Review Notes
Financial Statement Analysis - Review Notes

Cost Accounting

23 April 2016
Role of Costing and Cost Accounting in the Organizations
Introduction to Cost Terms - Review Notes

Traditional Cost Objectives and Their Utility
Job Costing - Review Notes


Activity-Based Costing and Activity-Based Budgeting
Process Costing - Review Notes



29 April

Operations Management - Subject Update 2016
Supply Chain Management - Subject Update 2016




To May - Management Knowledge Revision

One Year MBA Knowledge Revision Plan


January  - February  - March  - April  - May   -   June

July  - August     - September  - October  - November  - December



Included in the A to Z Blogging Challenge Posts

Birthdays of Management Scholars and Executives in April


1 - Prof Maike Andresen (1971) - Chair for HRM
      https://www.uni-bamberg.de/en/bwl-pm/chair/prof-dr-maike-andresen/
2 - Jan Jantsch (1960)
3 - Mark Albion (1951)
4 - Charles Buxton Going (1863)  - Principles of Industrial Engineering - Book in 1911
5
6 - Armand V. Feigenbaum (1920) - Total Quality Control
      Clayton Christensen (1952) - Disruptive innovations
7
8
9
10 - Joseph Pulitzer (1847), Perry Sink Marshall (1969)
11 - Charles Eugene Bedaux (1886) - Check?  26 October 1886 (according to Wikipedia)
12 - Elwood S. Buffa (1923)  - Modern Production Management, Operations Management
13 - W. Charles Redding (1914), -
        Michael Hammer (1948) - Business Process Reengineering
14-  Eric Brynjolfsson (1962)
15 - Glen L. Urban (1940)
16
17 - J.P. Morgan (1837)
18 - Frederick Herzberg (1923),   Hygiene factors - Motivation factors model
       Bengt R. Holmstrom (1949),
       Niall Ferguson (1964),
       Robert Allen Phillips (1968)

19- James J. Heckman (Economics Nobel Prize Winner, 1944), James B. Orlin (1953),
      Peter Bowman Scott-Morgan (1958)
20
21- Max Weber (1864)  http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/638565/Max-Weber
      Alan Cerf
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29 - Dan Ariely (1967)
30

January  - February  - March  - April  - May   -   June

July  - August     - September  - October  - November  - December



Included in the A to Z Blogging Challenge Posts

Last Year Plan Items


Cost Information for Pricing Decisions



Cost Behavior Analysis and Relevant Costs

Costing for Strategic Profitability Analysis



Cost Information for Customer Profitability Analysis

Costing for Spoilage, Rework and Scrap



Costing for Quality, Time and the Theory of Constraints

Costing for Inventory Management, JIT and Backflush


February 19 - 25


Cost Information and Analysis for Capital Budgeting

Cost Information for Management Control and Performance Control



Cost Information for Transfer Pricing

Managerial Accounting or Management Accounting - Review Notes



Relevant Information and Decision Making - Marketing Decisions

Relevant Information and Decision Making - Production



Relevant Information and Decision Making - HR

The Master Budget - Accounting Information


Flexible Budgets and Variance Analysis - Review Notes

Responsibility Accounting for Management Control

February 26 to March 4


Accounting Information for Management Control in Divisionalized Companies

Capital Budgeting - Accounting and Cost Information


To May - Management Knowledge Revision

One Year MBA Knowledge Revision Plan













Management of Training Programmes - Training Function

Managing Change in Improvement Projects



Manufacturing Management - Introduction

Mergers and Acquisitions - Introduction



Engineering Economy or Engineering Economics:

Introduction to Engineering Economics


April 23 - 29


Present-Worth Comparisons

Required Rate of Return for Investment or Expenditure



Rate-of-Return Calculations

Equivalent Annual-Worth Comparisons



Machine Selection Problem

Sensitivity Analysis - Engineering  Economics



Structural Analysis of Alternatives


Peter Drucker on Scientific Management - Industrial Engineering,


To May - Management Knowledge Revision

One Year MBA Knowledge Revision Plan

January  - February  - March  - April  - May   -   June

July  - August     - September  - October  - November  - December



Included in the A to Z Blogging Challenge Posts

















April 26, 2017

Values Statement of the Organization



In the organizational culture model, behavior is the result of values and beliefs. Values are ideas now being promoted by the organization. Beliefs are the results of values promoted earlier and also the experience of people and the organization.

Behavior can be changed by values being promoted presently. Hence, values statement by the top management is very important. It is not just statement. The management has to assess the behavior that will result from the values being promoted. Is the behavior positive for organizational goals? They have to estimate the results that will come with various values and have to select the right combination.


Build-A-Bear Workshop

Core Values: Reach, Learn, Di-bear-sity Colla-bear-ate Give, Cele-bear-ate

L.L.Bean

Core Values Statement: Sell good merchandise at a reasonable profit, treat your customers like human beings, and they will always come back for more.
This quote from Leon Leonwood Bean has been known as “L.L.’s Golden Rule” at his namesake company since the 1920s, and it is posted prominently in its retail stores and manufacturing and shipping facilities,

Zappos.com

10 Core Values:
1. Deliver WOW Through Service
2. Embrace and Drive Change
3. Create Fun and a Little Weirdness
4. Be Adventurous, Creative, and Open-Minded
5. Pursue Growth and Learning
6. Build Open and Honest Relationships with Communication
7. Build a Positive Team and Family Spirit
8. Do More with Less
9. Be Passionate and Determined
10. Be Humble

Wegmans Food Markets

Our “Who We Are” Values: Caring, High Standards, Making a Difference, Respect, and Empowerment

Bright Horizons Family Solutions

Core Values Statement: The HEART Principles:
Honesty
Excellence
Accountability
Respect
Teamwork

Coke’s values include having the courage to shape a better future, leveraging collective genius, being real, and being accountable and committed.

Differentiating Role of Values from Other Similar Concepts

A vision statement says what the organization wishes to be like in some years’ time. It’s usually drawn up by senior management, in an effort to provide a memorable destiny.

The mission describes what business the organization is in (and what it isn’t) both now and projecting into the future. Its aim is to provide focus for management and staff.

Values describe the desired culture. They serve as a behavioral compass.

Principles give employees a set of directions.


Purpose provides outward focus. Purpose statements must  inspire your staff to do good work for customers. So purpose statements  must  express the organization’s impact on the lives of customers and clients.  Make employees feel the benefit they are providing to customers.

http://fortune.com/2015/03/13/company-slogans/

Your Company’s Purpose Is Not Its Vision, Mission, or Values
https://hbr.org/2014/09/your-companys-purpose-is-not-its-vision-mission-or-values


Top Management Challenges


This article is part of #AtoZChallenge 2017 for Blogging Posts. My Theme for the Challenge is Top Management Challenges - Full List of Articles  http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2016/12/a-to-z-2017-blogging-challenge-top.html


To Know More About A to Z Blogging Challenge

April 25, 2017

Utility - Value to Customer


The products of any organization must have utility to the customer. Based on the utility to him customer values a product and offers it to the producer in return for the product.

Product conception, development and design and its further marketing activities are part of product management. Within the marketing discipline product management is popularly used. Within the product development and design areas product development management is the term more popularly used.

The managers of the company have to see that the products utility is more to get higher value for it. The value given for a product depends on other services also that are provided along with the product like delivery location, warranty offered, the retail environment etc.

Product Management is a technical capability in marketing and it deals with the planning, forecasting, production and marketing of a product, proposition or portfolio of products, throughout a product life cycle.

Below are 5 levels of this competence  in the area of innovation and management

Level 5

Leads organisation wide co-operation in the development of customer value propositions, identifying strategic opportunities for innovation.

Leads and directs the management of projects related to the delivery of customer value propositions and product/service portfolios

4

Manages cross-functional processes for the development of customer value propositions and their progression to market

Manages and maintains customer value propositions and product/service portfolios through cross-functional teams

3
Contributes to the development of customer value propositions

Contributes to the management of customer value propositions and product/service portfolios

2
Provides information to support the development of customer value propositions

Assists with the management of customer value propositions and product/service portfolios

1
Recognises the importance of analysing product portfolio performance and innovating new customer propositions

Recognises the importance of developing, launching and monitoring customer value propositions

CEO has to develop level 5 competence in development of customer value proposition and managing to provide value to customer.

http://www.cim.co.uk/more/professional-marketing-competencies/


Top Management Challenges


This article is part of #AtoZChallenge 2017 for Blogging Posts. My Theme for the Challenge is Top Management Challenges - Full List of Articles  http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2016/12/a-to-z-2017-blogging-challenge-top.html


To Know More About A to Z Blogging Challenge

April 24, 2017

Technology Management and Innovation



Innovation is a challenge for top managers. Innovations are risky, with the likelihood of failures which will be noticed by one and all. But new products and services are to be developed and introduced to create winners which will allow the company to grow and survive in a competitive market wherein new entrepreneurs continually enter with new ideas and products. A company cannot engage itself totally in exploiting the existing products neglecting invention, development and new product introduction. Hence innovation management is a challenge for top managers.

Excerpts from
44th Sir Mokshagundam Visvesvaraya Memorial Lecture. 2001
Industry,Academia and Innovation
Dr Amit Chatterjee
Chief Technology Officer, TATA STEEL, Jamshedpur



Innovation is the outcome of two distinct steps - firstly, the generation of an idea or invention; and secondly, the conversion of that invention into business. It is possible to represent innovation as Innovation = Invention + Exploitation.

Invention encompasses all steps aimed at creating new ideas and getting them to work. Exploitation
includes all stages of commercial development, including focusing of the ideas generated towards specific objectives, followed by evaluation of those objectives. Thus, while Invention through extremely difficult is the outcome of a brief moment of inspiration and magic, exploitation is more involved and needs time. The overall management of technological innovation is a science by itself. It includes the organisation and direction of human and capital resources towards effectively: (i) creating new knowledge; (ii) generating technical ideas aimed at new and enhanced products, manufacturing processes, as well as services; (iii) developing those ideas into working prototypes; and finally (iv) transferring them into manufacturing, distribution, and use by mankind at large.

Technologically innovative outcomes take many forms - incremental or radical in degree; modification of existing entities or the creation of entirely new entities; embodied in products, processes or services; oriented towards consumer, industrial, or governmental use; and based on various single or multiple technologies. Whereas invention is marked by the discovery of a state of new existence, usually in a laboratory or at best at a bench-scale level, innovation is characterised by first use (in manufacturing or in a market). Most organised scientific and engineering activities, certainly within any given manufacturing segment, stretch beyond the idea-generating stage. This may not always produce radical breakthroughs, but result in a broad base of incremental technological advances, sometimes leading to major technical changes.

Research conducted so far in the area of technology management has focused primarily on incremental product innovations oriented toward industrial markets. Neither the less frequently arising areas of radical innovation nor process innovation has received much attention.

The right balance of what organisation theorist James March has termed exploitation of proven knowledge versus exploration of new possibilities varies from industry to industry. But, even in companies that are taken as role models for encouraging innovation, only a small percentage of effort is usually devoted to generating and testing new products and services. This comparative rarity helps explain why practices that support innovation may seem odd and provoke discomfort and why managers hesitate to use them even when they should.

Traditional thinking about the management of innovation focuses almost exclusively on internal factors - the capabilities and processes within companies for creating and commercialising technology. Although the criticality of these factors is undeniable, the external environment for innovation is at least as important. For example, the striking innovative output of Israeli firms is due not simply to more effective technology management, but also, to Israel's favourable environment for innovation, including strong universityindustry linkages and a large pool of highly trained scientists and engineers. The most fertile location for innovation also varies markedly across fields. The United States was an especially attractive environment for innovation in pharmaceuticals in the Nineties, while Sweden and Finland have seen extraordinary rates of innovation in wireless technology (Ericsson and Nokia).

While the innovation infrastructure sets the basic conditions for innovation. it is ultimately companies that introduce and commercialise innovations. Innovation and the commercialisation of new technologies take place disproportionately in clusters - geographic concentrations of interconnected companies and institutions in a particular field.

44th Sir Mokshagundam Visvesvaraya Memorial Lecture. 2001
Industry,Academia and Innovation
Dr Amit Chatterjee
Chief Technology Officer, TATA STEEL, Jamshedpur



Top Management Challenges


This article is part of #AtoZChallenge 2017 for Blogging Posts. My Theme for the Challenge is Top Management Challenges - Full List of Articles  http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2016/12/a-to-z-2017-blogging-challenge-top.html


To Know More About A to Z Blogging Challenge

Transfer of Brand Equity from One Brand to Another in a Corporate - Brand Portfolio Management





Companies that enter new businesses to escape a weak position generally become weaker still, because they move into markets where they lack the capabilities needed to succeed.
https://www.strategy-business.com/article/00354?gko=478fb


If you already have one successful product line, you want to be able to use that reputation to help boost your new product line. Reputation.com can help you utilize a positive reputation in various areas of your business. This will allow you to impact your business quicker and more effectively than trying to build your reputation from the ground up.
http://smallbusinessreputation.com/how-reputation-transfer-can-impact-your-business/


What is Corporate Reputation? 


There  are  3  elements  to  reputation,  known  as  the  reputational radar.

•  Brand  Reputation –  how  the  public  perceives  a  brand.
•  Organisational  reputation –  what  the  public  think  about  the  ‘organisation’  as  oppose  to  the  brand.  For  example, Unilever  PLC has a house of brands and also has individual sub brands. Therefore the  public  reputation  of  the  company  can  be  different  to  the reputation of the individual brands.
• Stakeholder reputation– the reputation that stakeholders have of  the  brand  or  the  company  that  they  are  dealing  with.
(Stakeholder  =  person  group  or  another  organisation that  has  a direct or indirect stake in a company.)
Corporate Reputation: definitions and representative history of literature
contributed by Toby Ingram
www.reputation.asia/files/RM-CR-Literature-Review.pdf


Brand name substitution and brand equity transfer
Journal of Product & Brand Management, 2012, Vol. 21 Issue: 2, pp.117-125,
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/10610421211215562


Reputation Transfer to Enter New B-to-B Markets: Measuring and Modelling Approaches
Christine Falkenreck
Springer Science & Business Media, 17-Oct-2009 - Business & Economics - 229 pages


An increasing number of products and services are not differentiated by inherent features, but by the vendors, particularly their reputation and marketing commu- cation. Consequently, a positive reputation provides competing vendors with a virtually inimitable competitive advantage. Contemporary research concerning antecedents and consequences of reputation in the domain of marketing is dominated by branding and line extension issues. Organizations’ communication efforts and the relation of reputation and the c- munication media are not fully understood; nor have they been challenged up to now. Moreover, customers’ perception of reputation is clearly embedded in their cultural context. However, contemporary marketing research restricts both conceptual and empirical considerations to Western-type cultures. Frequently, even the differences in Western-type cultures are neglected. Considering these shortcomings in contemporary marketing research, Dr. Christine Falkenreck investigates the opportunities and limits, and also the potential bene?ts and dangers of transferring a vendor’s positive reputation to product categories never produced or offered by the considered vendor. Embedding the empirical investigation of both reputation management and reputation transfer in a coherent theoretical framework, which is grounded in the Commitment-Trust theory, is her merit. She derives and validates an integrated model that appears to be valid in all cultures considered in her study. The results of this analysis contribute substantially to our understanding of reputation measuring and managing. These results are not restricted to academic interests and they provided practitioners with a variety of new insights. Thus, this thesis will ho- fully be widely discussed in both academia and management practice.
https://books.google.co.in/books?id=2JtT7gNKk0UC

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 30, 2003     Pages 72-79

TRANSFER OF BRAND EQUITY IN BRAND EXTENSIONS: THE IMPORTANCE OF BRAND LOYALTY

Leif E. Hem, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration
Nina M. Iversen, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration
http://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/8739/volumes/v30/NA-30

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/229125832_fig2_Fig-2-Brand-equity-transfer-following-mergersacquisitions



Top Management Challenges


This article is part of #AtoZChallenge 2017 for Blogging Posts. My Theme for the Challenge is Top Management Challenges - Full List of Articles  http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2016/12/a-to-z-2017-blogging-challenge-top.html


To Know More About A to Z Blogging Challenge