December 31, 2017

MBA Core Management Knowledge - One Year Revision Schedule


The blog contains articles on all management subjects developed using the most popular book on the subject. You can read articles on the sybject of your choice or use the following schedule.


One Year MBA Knowledge Revision Plan

Revision Schedule


Current Month -  April  


January  - February  - March  - April  - May   -   June

July       - August     - September  - October  - November  - December


Subject Details of Each Month



January  (Principles of Management) - February (P.of M & Marketing Management from 23 Feb 2015 )
March (Mktg. Mgmt. & Operations Management from 17 March 2015)  -
April  (Supply Chain Management and Financial & Cost Accounting)

May  (Management Accounting & Organizational Behavior)  -
June (Innovation, Industrial Engineering and Economics)

July  (Economics, Engineering Economics, & Managerial Ethics)   - August    (Statistics, Quality and Six Sigma, OR & BRM)

September (HRM, Mentoring, Training, Maintenance, Energy & Environment Management)  -  October  (Information Technology and Management Information Systems, Logistics - Warehousing and Transport)

November (Strategic Management & Financial Management)  - December (Business Laws, Negotiation, Taxes and Government Relations)

Subject                                               Revision Period

Principles of Management                15 January   to   19 February

Marketing Management                    22 February to   16 March

Operations Management                   17 March     to    2 April

Supply Chain Management                 3 April       to  15 April

Financial & Cost Accounting            16 April       to  12 May




I am participating in April A to Z Blogging Challenge and I am writing on the theme Top Management Challenges.

Top Management Challenges.


Article 1: Awareness of Environment
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2017/04/awareness-of-environment.html




Updated 1 April 2017.  22 February 2017,  10 December 2015




May 31, 2017

May - Management Knowledge Revision



First Week  1 May to 5 May


Cost Information for Pricing Decisions
Cost Behavior Analysis and Relevant Costs

Costing for Strategic Profitability Analysis
Cost Information for Customer Profitability Analysis

Costing for Spoilage, Rework and Scrap
Costing for Quality, Time and the Theory of Constraints

Costing for Inventory Management, JIT and Backflush
Cost Information and Analysis for Capital Budgeting

Cost Information for Management Control and Performance Control
Cost Information for Transfer Pricing

Second Week 8 May to 12 May


Managerial Accounting or Management Accounting - Review Notes
Relevant Information and Decision Making - Marketing Decisions

Relevant Information and Decision Making - Production
Relevant Information and Decision Making - HR

The Master Budget - Accounting Information
Flexible Budgets and Variance Analysis - Review Notes

Responsibility Accounting for Management Control
Accounting Information for Management Control in Divisionalized Companies

Capital Budgeting - Accounting and Cost Information


Revision of Organizational Behavior

________________



















________________




Introduction to Organizational Behavior

Third Week   15 May to 19 May

Environmental context: Information Technology and Globalization
 Environmental context: Diversity and Ethics

 Organizational Context: Design and Culture
Organizational Context:: Reward Systems

Perception and Attribution
Personality and Attitudes

Motivational Needs and Processes
Positive Psychology Approach to OB


Communication
 Decision Making

Fourth Week  22 May to 26 May


 Stress and Conflict
Power and Politics

Groups and Teams
 Managing Performance through Job Design and Goal Setting


Principles of Industrial Engineering Presented by Professor K.V.S.S. Narayana Rao (Author of this blog) on 23 May 2017 at the Annual Conference of Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers in Pittsburgh, USA.  Industrial Engineering is a management subject or discipline with Engineering as the foundation. Its primary application area is engineering systems. It augmented application area is any system.  INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING IS SYSTEM EFFICIENCY ENGINEERING AND HUMAN EFFORT ENGINEERING (Definition by Narayana Rao - Published in Udyog Pragati, Jounral of NITIE in 2006)
_______________

_______________

 Behavioral Performance Management
Effective Leadership Process


Great Leaders: Styles, Activities, and Skills
Principles of Innovation

Innovation - Strategic Issues and Methodology
Idea Generation in Organizations


29 May

To June - Management Knowledge Revision

May Month - Birthdays of Management Scholars and Business and Industry Magnates and Accomplished Professionals - Biographies


1
2
3 - Sidney S. Alexander (1916)
4
5 - Jerry A. Hausman (1946)
6 - Sigmund Freud (1856), Kenneth Blanchard (1939)
7
8 - Benjamin Graham (1894)  [Graham - Rao Method]
9
10 - Daniel Bell (1919), William James Reddin (1930),  Ikujiro Nonaka (1935)
11 - Morris Llewellyn Cooke (1872)
12 - Thomas H. Carroll II (1914)
13
14 - William R. Spriegel (1893), Mark Zuckerberg (1984) [Zuckerberg - Narayana Rao Reading Challenge 2015]
15 - Paul Samuelson (1915)
16 - Edward T. Hall (1914), Merton Miller (1923), Robert Butler Wilson Jr. (1937),  Catherine Tucker (1977)
17
18
19 - Harold Koontz (1908) Biography: http://mtrrp.blogspot.com/2014/05/prof-dr-harold-koontz-biography-and.html
20 - Henry Gantt (1861), Edwin C. Nevis (1926)
21
22
23 - Michael Porter (1947)
24 - Lilian Gilbreth (1878),
25 - Paul Cootner (1930)
26
27 - Philip Kotler (1931)
28
29
30
31




One Year MBA Knowledge Revision Plan

January  - February  - March  - April  - May   -   June

July  - August     - September  - October  - November  - December

_____________________________________________________

Updated 26 May 2017


Old Plan
To be Removed



Opportunities or Areas for Innovation














Product Design Efficiency Engineering

Project Management - Introduction - Revision Article



Selling Process – Prospecting

Sales Process – Call Planning



Approaching the Prospect

Interacting with the Prospect



Prospect Objections During Sales Presentations

Trial Close



Sales Closing Techniques

Service to Customer: Follow Up After The Sale

Second Week


Risk Premium

Safety Stock Determination



Scanning of Environment for Marketing Ideas

Scientific Approach, Engineering Approach, Management Approach



SHAREHOLDER VALUE MANAGEMENT THEORY REVIEW

Software Cost Management



Statistics - Introduction

Stock Market Efficiency Theory and Implications for Financial Management



Supervision - Introduction - Public Administration

Supply Chain Cost Reduction

Third Week






Suppy Behavior/Decisions of Firm in Competitive Markets

System Design Principles



Talent Management

Target Costing and Target Cost Management



Total Improvement Management

Total Industrial Engineering - H. Yamashina



Valuation and Verification of Closing Stock - Auditing

Valuation of Bonds and Equity Shares

Fourth Week



Variance Analysis, Flexible Budget and Management Control





What is Strategy in Simple Terms?

Who is a Knowledge Worker?



Communities of Practice

Audit Report - Auditing



Political Strategies in Use for Acquiring and Using Power

Personal Power and Social Power



Soft Power - Hard Power

Power - The Concept and Theory in Organizational Behavior





























May 29, 2017

Innovation Management - Research, Development, Design and Commercialization




2017

May

HOW TO APPLY LEAN THINKING IN INNOVATION, PRODUCT AND SERVICE DEVELOPMENT
Matti Perttula

Lean production seeks to increase flow (not resource) efficiency by reducing waste. Flow efficiency is calculated by dividing added value time with total time. The usual situation is that companies focus on resource efficiency rather than flow efficiency of a certain project.

http://www.innotiimi-icg.fi/blogi/item/785-lean-thinking-in-innovation-product-service-development

May 28, 2017

Digital Products, Services, Operations and Enterprise Innovation



Accenture


https://www.accenture.com/us-en/digital-index

https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insight-swift-agile-ruthlessly-customer-focused


Accenture is becoming a digital-first company,  digital first in two main directions – first, being the leader in providing digital services to our clients and second, making Accenture the most digitalized organization. So digitalization is on both sides, the client-facing side and the Accenture inside.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucerogers/2016/06/06/how-pierre-nanterme-positions-accenture-for-a-new-era-of-digital-based-services-growth/#4a31c0c858eb

http://diginomica.com/2016/06/24/accenture-ceo-is-all-about-the-new/


Leading in an Unpredictable World
MIT SMR -Magazine: Fall 2016
Pierre Nanterme (CEO - Accenture), interviewed by Paul Michelman
http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/conversation-with-the-ceo-pierre-nanterme-chairman-and-ceo-accenture/

Digital disruption has only just begun
Pierre Nanterme
CEO, Accenture
17 Jan 2016
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/01/digital-disruption-has-only-just-begun/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/vala-afshar/accenture-digital-7-digital-business-transformation-lessons_b_6622648.html




Mastering the Digital Innovation Challenge

Magazine: Spring 2017 Issue Research Highlight March 07, 2017
Fredrik Svahn, Lars Mathiassen, Rikard Lindgren, and Gerald C. Kan

http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/mastering-the-digital-innovation-challenge/

Related Research
F. Svahn, L. Mathiassen, and R. Lindgren, “Embracing Digital Innovation in Incumbent Firms: How Volvo Cars Managed Competing Concerns,” MIS Quarterly 41, no. 1 (March 2017): 239-253.



Digital innovation in Asia: What the world can learn

October 2016
http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/digital-mckinsey/our-insights/digital-innovation-in-asia-what-the-world-can-learn

When It Comes to Digital Innovation, Less Action, More Thought

Scott Anthony
Narvard Business Review
JANUARY 21, 2015

https://hbr.org/2015/01/when-it-comes-to-digital-innovation-less-action-more-thought



Before you take your minimal viable product to market, answer the following questions or do the suggested activity.

Identify offerings comparable to what you envision that have struggled commercially and find out why. Avoid the mistakes.

Consider why it is that the large companies that could have gone into the space you’re contemplating haven’t. Is it possible they know something you don’t?

Talk to someone who knows more than you do about the key activities  of your business, such as your target customer, distribution channel partner. Find out  hidden risks?

Plan and document, how you will do your first  transaction. Who is your first customer? How will he hear about your idea? How will she obtain it? How will you support him if he’s not happy?

Devour publicly available financial statements for companies competing in markets related to yours. How do people make money? What big investments are typically required? Are you missing an important ingredient that is necessary to compete? Are you underestimating what it will take to get to market?

Create a plan for how you will make money based on economic hypothesis of the existence of the market for the product you are planning to make and sell, and describe it to a business savvy friend. Ask that friend to poke holes in it.

May 27, 2017

The Socio Economic Approach to Management (SEAM)



The primary source for this article is the literature review by Chato B. Hazelberger in his Phd Thesis "Looking for the Evidence of TFW Virus." [School of Education UST, Minnesota, 2014].

In the 1970’s the Socio Economic Approach to Management (SEAM) was created in France as a systematic approach to management. Henri Savall and a group of researchers sought to integrate classical scientific management theories with the human relations school (Savall, 2010). The goal was to recognize and integrate the human factor, which according to the SEAM founders was overemphasized by the neoclassical human relations school and underappreciated by the traditional proponents of scientific management. What emerged was SEAM, which found its home at ISEOR. In 1973 ISEOR was created to manage SEAM consulting, and later doctoral work in SEAM (Savall, 2010).

SEAM is carried out by a team of consultants, who are referred to as intervener researchers. This title reflects the consultant’s role as both a consultant in the change process, and in continuing the research work of ISEOR.

Key to SEAM is the concept of hidden costs (Savall, 2008). Hidden costs are economic inefficiencies that come from dysfunctions. Dysfunctions can be explained as the gap between what is planned or directed and what actually occurs in the organization. By getting rid of the dysfunctions, an organization can release untapped potential allowing greater growth, new ideas, and cost savings.

SEAM classifies looks for dysfunctions in any of six categories: working conditions, work organization, time management, communication-coordination-cooperation, integrated training and strategic implementation. By finding dysfunctions in these areas and revealing their costs, SEAM finds additional revenue that can be returned to the bottom line, create potential for individual growth which will benefit the organization, and provide a better working environment.

From the beginning, SEAM was concerned about not just making organizations more effective, but also in studying the causes of the six dysfunctions. Early on, Savall (2013) suggested there was a flaw in the classic economic models. The classic models left out the human component. In searching for why this human element had been left out, the team at ISEOR identified that it was due to an overreliance on scientific management. They saw this particularly in the elements of scientific management as put forth by Frederick Taylor, Henri Fayol and Max Weber. ISEOR observed scientific management had an ideological flaw.

Acknowledging that scientific management had an ideology was important to understanding the TFW virus. Ideology “... describes the system of beliefs, values, and practices that reflects and reproduces existing social structures, systems and relations (Brookfield, 2005, p. 68).” An ideology is put forth as the true system of belief within the dominant group and is propagated as the one true way. Savall and his contemporaries at ISEOR observed that what was at the core of the scientific management was an ideology. That ideology was based on the work Taylor, Fayol, Weber.

When the Academy of Management was asked to update their list of the top 10 outstanding contributors to American business management thought and practice Taylor was named number one, Weber two, and Fayol five (Heames 2009).

The concept that setting goals is a management task is found in Fayol’s work and that element of strategic planning is found also in Porter and Kotter.


 Savall first put forth the metaphor of the virus in 1973 (Cristallini, 2012). He used the metaphor of a virus for three reasons:
• The virus was ideological in nature, contaminating decision making and analysis at a foundational level
• The virus caused changes in organizational structures and behavior
• The virus was continually transmitted within and to other organizations through training, practice, and management education

In his article “The role of governance in the fight against the global pandemic of the techno-economic virus,” Cristallini (2011) wrote extensively about the TFW virus as the root cause for the hidden costs and dysfunctions that ISEOR finds in organizations. He asserted that organizations are carrying this hidden virus. It is going undiagnosed, and current organizational change efforts are treating symptoms of the virus rather than the core problems of the organization which is the presence of the virus.

 Cristallini (2012) made the case that the proponents of the TFW virus view individuals as untrustworthy, and not intelligent or responsible. The individual is not free. In contrast to this, SEAM sees the individual as creative, and able to grow, change, and be trusted to do what helpful to the organization given the chance.

The virus promotes the view of individuals as untrustworthy with the health of the organization and even the protection of their own interests. This baseline belief about the individual leads to the conclusion that individuals must be controlled in order to do what is in their best interest and the best interest of the organization. The effect of this view of individuals is manifested in the symptoms of the TFW virus.

Manifestations of the Virus.

(Cristallini, 2011):
• Depersonalization and Submission
• An aristocratic view of the organization
• Apathy
• Separation

Cristillani (2011) argued two concepts promoted by the founders of the TFW Virus are depersonalization and submission. Cristallini (2011) explained depersonalization as the individual giving way to the needs of the organization. “Submission assumes that the individual complies with the requirements, because it accepts the principle of subordination, it is docile and waives his freedom and his aspirations” (p. 3). Depersonalization at its core is looking at the worker as a machine. The individual is unimportant; another resource to be used that is replaceable and interchangeable with any other worker (or possibly a machine).

Cristallini used the word massification to explain the concepts of depersonalization and submission. One image that Cristallini (2011) gave for massification was herding cattle. In the workplace that exhibits evidence of the virus there is a herder, and then there are the workers, who are the cattle who must be pushed along. No cow is different, and the job of management is simply to get the cattle to move in the right direction.

As defined by Cristallini (2011), submission occurs when individual aspirations and preferences give way to organizational good. More than just existing as a second consideration, individual aspirations and preferences must be in some ways suppressed in order to achieve organizational goals. Massification is also the result of the technocratic nature of organizations where the virus is present. Organizations are governed by rules and systems that are inflexible. Organizational rules, procedures, and standards, replace dialogue between understanding and intelligent individuals, unable to handle the unexpected and complexity because of their structure.

 “The TFW virus is profoundly marked by an aristocratic view of organizational life” (Conbere, Heorhiadi & Cristallini, 2014, p. 4) Cristallini (2011) argued that the separation of menial and noble tasks within an organization is evidence of the virus. Since some tasks are considered more important, the people who have the more important tasks are considered more important. This leads to artificial hierarchies. Time and energy are spent on the management of the hierarchy rather than on tasks related to the mission of the organization.

Apathy, or a lack of interest in work, results from a lack of hope. Conbere, Heorhiadi & Cristallini, (2014) used a similar concept in the term “blindness,” noting, “Our blindness prevents us from seeing, and thus we become unable to hope that it is possible to implement organizations which are flexible, cooperative and more livable” (p. 8). Socioeconomic approach tries to develop more livable organizations.

 In his original work Cristallini (2011) explained apathy partly as non-cooperation, “The virus has the effect of encouraging individuals and groups to withdraw their known world and not to open outwards” (p. 6). This non-cooperation is the workers way of disengaging essentially because the organization does not incent workers to cooperate. Apathy is a key to the virus because apathy means people are resigned to whatever happens, who do not feel that they can or even should affect change in the organization (Cristallini, 2011).


Another way the virus manifests itself is in separations or divisions in the workplace, marked by borders, walls and fences. One reason for these walls is hyperspecialization or the separation of functions based on faulty logic. Cristallini (2011) saw a linkage between the separation of tasks and an increase in egotism and selfishness. He said the virus is observed when group effort is not recognized; instead individual tasks in very specialized areas are encouraged and promoted. People are not rewarded for teamwork and cooperation, but rather excellence in their own small task. Therefore the focus is not on making the whole better, but rather on making oneself look better. This non-cooperation is evidence of the virus as well, as hyperspecialization is rewarded over teamwork and the effect on others is not considered. The virus encourages the building of walls between areas of the organization.


Books


Becoming Agile: How the SEAM Approach to Management Builds Adaptability

Christopher G. Worley, Veronique Zardet, Marc Bonnet, Amandine Savall
John Wiley & Sons, 15-Sep-2015 - Business & Economics - 192 pages



Becoming Agile: How the SEAM Approach to Management Builds Adaptability illustrates the process of becoming an agile organization. Reflecting the principles presented in The Agility Factor, readers are taken on a real-world journey of transformation and change. This short-format case study of the French company Brioche Pasquier highlights how one organization successfully implemented the principles of agility using the socio-economic approach to management, detailing each step of the process and describing how every decision brought the goal closer within reach. Readers get inside the heads of decision makers to gain insight into how tough decisions were made, how new, important, and flexible management tools were implemented, and how the necessary changes ultimately benefitted both the organization and the people who made it work. From overarching policy to day-to-day procedure, the story provides a clear example of how an agile organization is developed, giving readers a foundation upon which to implement similar changes in their own organization.

 This case study allows readers to learn from an organization that got through the inertia and put the principles of agility into action, with incredible results.

Understand how the principles of agility can be implemented using a specific intervention strategy
Tailor those principles to suit any organization
Calculate and convert the "hidden costs" of traditional organizational design into flexible, value added activities
Formulate and execute an actionable agility strategy
Big changes require a deep understanding of the problem at hand, and a viable plan for steering the organization in a better direction. By seeing how it's been done before, organizations can take a proven approach and tailor it to their specific needs. For those tasked with formulating the agility strategy, Becoming Agile: How the SEAM Approach to Management Builds Adaptability provides invaluable insight.

https://books.google.co.in/books?id=GZVNCgAAQBAJ


Mastering Hidden Costs and Socio-economic Performance


Henri Savall, VĂ©ronique Zardet
IAP, 2008 - Business & Economics - 346 pages


 As research and theory building in management consulting have grown rapidly during the past several years, the series is dedicated to capturing the latest thinking from applied scholars and scholarly practitioners in this field.  This volume is a translation and modest updating of Henri Savall and Veronique Zardet's original work on mastering "hidden costs," initially published in French in 1987.

https://books.google.co.in/books?id=nrCmfLDFkwkC


Socio-economic Interventions in Organizations: The Intervener-researcher and the SEAM Approach to Organizational Analysis



Anthony F. Buono, Henri Savall
IAP, 2007 - Business & Economics - 441 pages


The volume begins with a chapter by Henri Savall, founder and director of the ISEOR Institute and creator of the SEAM methodology, that presents an overview of the development of the socio-economic approach to management, and its guiding frameworks and methodology. The chapter's detailed explanation of the underlying thinking, tools, and techniques of socio-economic management serves as the primer for the remainder of the volume. The book is then divided into three sections. The first part presents illustrations of SEAM interventions in different types of organizations, including industrial and service companies, and not-for-profit organizations, including cultural institutions and sports clubs. The next section looks at cross-cultural applications and assessments of SEAM experiments in Africa, Asia, Mexico, and the United States, with a concluding chapter on intervening in multinational corporations in general. The volume concludes with a section that examines different issues and challenges in SEAM intervention, ranging from the impact on and role of middle managers in the SEAM process, intervening in small organizations, SEAM's facilitative role in operationalizing and institutionalizing information technology, conceptualizing, and implementing organizational change, facilitating merger and acquisition integration, and the application of socio-economic management in sales and marketing. The book also contains a combined glossary and chapter index that provides a definition of key terms and concepts in the SEAM methodology and where they appear in the volume. These key terms are highlighted in bold italics throughout the volume, illustrating their application in different contexts.

https://books.google.co.in/books?id=FcPc7AC1PkkC





May 26, 2017

Leadership - Subject Update




2017

May 2017

45 Questions Every Leader Should Answer

By Frank Sonnenberg
http://www.franksonnenbergonline.com/blog/45-questions-every-leader-should-answer/

Good Bosses Switch Between Two Leadership Styles

Jon Maner
Jon Maner is a professor of management and organizations at Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University.
DECEMBER 05, 2016, HBR Article

The two styles are termed Dominance and Prestige. They could have been termed Single Person Dominance (Lone Boxer) and Team Decision Making (Foot Ball Team).
https://hbr.org/2016/12/good-bosses-switch-between-two-leadership-styles

Related
http://jon-maner-dev.squarespace.com/publications-case/the-essential-tension-between-leadership-and-power

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/sex-murder-and-the-meaning-life/201606/what-kind-leader-are-you

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/11/01/bossy-vs-buddy-two-leadership-styles-each-with-its-place.html



2016

http://www.leadershipissues.com/

Leadership Freak - A popular blog on leadership      https://leadershipfreak.blog/

What Great Managers Do Daily

Ryan Fuller & Nina Shikaloff
HBR
DECEMBER 14, 2016
https://hbr.org/2016/12/what-great-managers-do-daily

Decoding Leadership: What really matters


Our most recent research, however, suggests that a small subset of leadership skills closely correlates with leadership success, particularly among frontline leaders. Using our own practical experience and searching the relevant academic literature, we came up with a comprehensive list of 20 distinct leadership traits. We did a survey and  found  that leaders in organizations with high-quality leadership teams typically displayed 4 of the 20 possible types of behavior; these 4, indeed, explained 89 percent of the variance between strong and weak organizations in terms of leadership effectiveness .

• Solving problems effectively: The process that precedes decision making is problem solving, when information is gathered, analyzed, and considered.

• Operating with a strong results orientation: Leadership is about not only developing and communicating a vision and setting objectives but also following through to achieve results. Leaders with a strong results orientation tend to emphasize the importance of efficiency and productivity and to prioritize the highest-value work.

• Seeking different perspectives: This trait is conspicuous in managers who monitor trends affecting organizations, grasp changes in the environment, encourage employees to contribute ideas that could improve performance, accurately differentiate between important and unimportant issues, and give the appropriate weight to stakeholder concerns. Leaders who do well on this dimension typically base their decisions on sound analysis and avoid the many biases to which decisions are prone.


2015





The Art of Giving and Receiving Advice.


Periodical
By: Garvin, David A.; Margolis, Joshua D. Harvard Business Review. Jan/Feb2015, Vol. 93 Issue 1/2, p60-71.


Seeking and giving advice are central to effective leadership and decision making, and they require emotional intelligence, self-awareness, restraint, diplomacy, and patience on both sides. In this article, the authors argue that they are practical skills one  can learn and apply to great effect. The most common obstacles to effectively seeking and giving advice are  thinking one already has the answers, defining the problem poorly, and overstepping boundaries.  They  offer practical guidelines for getting past them.


Five stages of advising are identified: (1) finding the right fit; (2) developing a shared understanding; (3) crafting alternatives; (4) converging on a decision; and (5) putting advice into action. Each stage includes suggestions for seekers and for advisers.



The Authenticity Paradox. 

By: Ibarra, Herminia. Harvard Business Review. Jan/Feb2015, Vol. 93 Issue 1/2, p52-59.

INSEAD professor Herminia Ibarra argues, a simplistic understanding of what authenticity means can limit leaders' growth and impact.  In this article, Ibarra explains how leaders can develop an "adaptively authentic" style.  It's OK to change tactics from one day to the next, she says by figuring  out what's right for the challenges and circumstances we face.




2014

July

The Skills Leaders Need at Every Level

by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman
HBR Blog Post
16 Skills are listed in order of importance. Top 7 are said to be important.

1. Inspires and motivates others.
2. Displays high integrity and honesty
3. Solves problems and analyzes issues
4. Drives for results
5. Communicates powerfully and prolifically
6. Collaborates and promotes teamwork
7. Builds relationships
http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/07/the-skills-leaders-need-at-every-level/

Leadership Development Beyond Competencies: Moving to a Holistic Approach
Marian N. Ruderman, Cathleen Klerkin, and Carol Connelly
Center for Creative Leadership - White Paper
http://www.ccl.org/leadership/pdf/research/LeadershipDevelopmentCompetencies.pdf

Book review of Jane Dutton and Gretchen Spreitzer, How to Be a Positive Leader: Small Actions, Big Impact.
http://positivepsychologynews.com/news/kathryn-britton/2014073029174





2013

December

How to be a better boss?

Ask a person whether he wants to recommend his boss to his friends as the ideal boss to work under.
http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/how-to-be-a-better-boss/

May
Knowledge@Wharton article
Social Technology and the Changing Context of Leadership
Social technology is changing the way leaders do conversations with their group members especially in large organizations. The article presents ideas on this issue
http://wlp.wharton.upenn.edu/LeadershipDigest/social-technology.cfm

2012
Sloan Management Review Article Spring, March 2012

How to Become a Better Leader

The article describes Big 5 Personality factors and use of them in developing oneself as a better leader.
http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/how-to-become-a-better-leader/


Leadership Basic Articles

Organizational Behavior Articles

Theories of Leadership 
Cognitive Resources Theory of Leadership
Leadership Styles, Roles, Activities, Skills and Development

Principles of Management Articles


Updated 29 May 2017,  22 February 2017, 6 December 2016, 12 October 2016, 10 December 2015

May 25, 2017

May - Management Knowledge Revision with Links






First Week  1 May to 5 May 2016


Cost Information for Pricing Decisions
Cost Behavior Analysis and Relevant Costs

Costing for Strategic Profitability Analysis
Cost Information for Customer Profitability Analysis

Costing for Spoilage, Rework and Scrap
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/costing-for-spoilage-rework-and-scrap.html
Costing for Quality, Time and the Theory of Constraints
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/costing-for-quality-time-and-theory-of.html


Costing for Inventory Management, JIT and Backflush
Cost Information and Analysis for Capital Budgeting

Cost Information for Management Control and Performance Control
Cost Information for Transfer Pricing

Second Week 8 May to 12 May 2016


Managerial Accounting or Management Accounting - Review Notes
Relevant Information and Decision Making - Marketing Decisions

Relevant Information and Decision Making - Production
Relevant Information and Decision Making - HR

The Master Budget - Accounting Information
Flexible Budgets and Variance Analysis - Review Notes

Responsibility Accounting for Management Control
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/responsibility-accounting-for.html
Accounting Information for Management Control in Divisionalized Companies
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/accounting-information-for-management.html

Capital Budgeting - Accounting and Cost Information


Revision of Organizational Behavior

________________



















________________




Introduction to Organizational Behavior
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/introduction-to-organizational-behavior_06.html

Third Week   15 May to 19 May

Environmental context: Information Technology and Globalization
 Environmental context: Diversity and Ethics

 Organizational Context: Design and Culture
Organizational Context:: Reward Systems

Perception and Attribution
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/perception-and-attribution-review-notes.html
Personality and Attitudes
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/personality-and-attitudes-review-notes.html

Motivational Needs and Processes
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/motivational-needs-and-processes-review.html
Positive Psychology Approach to OB
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/positive-psychology-approach-to-ob.html


Communication
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/communication-review-notes.html
Decision Making
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/decision-making-review-notes.html

Fourth Week  22 May to 26 May 2015



Stress and Conflict
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/stress-and-conflict-review-notes.html
Power and Politics
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2011/12/power-and-politics-review-notes.html

Groups and Teams
http://nraomtr.blogspot.in/2011/12/groups-and-teams-review-notes.html
Managing Performance through Job Design and Goal Setting
http://nraomtr.blogspot.in/2011/12/managing-and-leading-for-high.html

Behavioral Performance Management
http://nraomtr.blogspot.in/2011/12/behavioral-performance-management.html
Effective Leadership Process
http://nraomtr.blogspot.in/2011/12/effective-leadership-processes-revision.html


Great Leaders: Styles, Activities, and Skills
http://nraomtr.blogspot.in/2011/12/great-leaders-styles-activities-and.html
Principles of Innovation
http://nraomtr.blogspot.in/2014/11/the-ten-principles-of-innovation.html

Innovation - Strategic Issues and Methodology
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2014/11/innovation-strategic-issues-and.html
Idea Generation in Organizations
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2014/11/idea-generation-in-organizations.html


28 & 29 May

To June - Management Knowledge Revision

May Month - Birthdays of Management Scholars and Business and Industry Magnates and Accomplished Professionals - Biographies


1
2
3 - Sidney S. Alexander (1916)
4
5 - Jerry A. Hausman (1946)
6 - Sigmund Freud (1856), Kenneth Blanchard (1939)
7
8 - Benjamin Graham (1894)  [Graham - Rao Method]
9
10 - Daniel Bell (1919), William James Reddin (1930),  Ikujiro Nonaka (1935)
11 - Morris Llewellyn Cooke (1872)
12 - Thomas H. Carroll II (1914)
13
14 - William R. Spriegel (1893), Mark Zuckerberg (1984) [Zuckerberg - Narayana Rao Reading Challenge 2015]
15 - Paul Samuelson (1915)
16 - Edward T. Hall (1914), Merton Miller (1923), Robert Butler Wilson Jr. (1937),  Catherine Tucker (1977)
17
18
19 - Harold Koontz (1908) Biography: http://mtrrp.blogspot.com/2014/05/prof-dr-harold-koontz-biography-and.html
20 - Henry Gantt (1861), Edwin C. Nevis (1926)
21
22
23 - Michael Porter (1947)
24 - Lilian Gilbreth (1878),
25 - Paul Cootner (1930)
26
27 - Philip Kotler (1931)
28
29
30
31




One Year MBA Knowledge Revision Plan

January  - February  - March  - April  - May   -   June

July  - August     - September  - October  - November  - December

_____________________________________________________

Old Plan
To be Removed



Opportunities or Areas for Innovation














Product Design Efficiency Engineering

Project Management - Introduction - Revision Article



Selling Process – Prospecting

Sales Process – Call Planning



Approaching the Prospect

Interacting with the Prospect



Prospect Objections During Sales Presentations

Trial Close



Sales Closing Techniques

Service to Customer: Follow Up After The Sale

Second Week


Risk Premium

Safety Stock Determination



Scanning of Environment for Marketing Ideas

Scientific Approach, Engineering Approach, Management Approach



SHAREHOLDER VALUE MANAGEMENT THEORY REVIEW

Software Cost Management



Statistics - Introduction

Stock Market Efficiency Theory and Implications for Financial Management



Supervision - Introduction - Public Administration

Supply Chain Cost Reduction

Third Week






Suppy Behavior/Decisions of Firm in Competitive Markets

System Design Principles



Talent Management

Target Costing and Target Cost Management



Total Improvement Management

Total Industrial Engineering - H. Yamashina



Valuation and Verification of Closing Stock - Auditing

Valuation of Bonds and Equity Shares

Fourth Week



Variance Analysis, Flexible Budget and Management Control





What is Strategy in Simple Terms?

Who is a Knowledge Worker?



Communities of Practice

Audit Report - Auditing



Political Strategies in Use for Acquiring and Using Power

Personal Power and Social Power



Soft Power - Hard Power

Power - The Concept and Theory in Organizational Behavior




























May 24, 2017

Innovation - Strategic Issues and Methodology



Strategy is about the future, and developing strategy is the process of thinking about the future, predicting it, making decisions about it, and taking action to create profitable future. Since
innovations are critical to the future, it’s clear that the management of innovation is entirely strategic in nature.


The classical model of strategy development begins with an assessment of the future, a set of predications about what’s going to happen, followed by the development of initiatives that align with that future to assure survivaland growth of the organization. Future is entirely risky and it makes much more sense to prepare for a multitude of possible futures by developing a strategic portfolio of initiatives and innovations.

The astute innovation strategy thus defines a range of initiatives that could become important under many different future states; in other words, a portfolio. The elements of such a portfolio - products, services, processes and  organizational approaches,  etc. -  will be applicable in a variety of different
future conditions,  and as events unfold some will prove to be invaluable while others will be irrelevant, remaining forever on the shelf. With many projects under way at the same time, the typical, large R&D group is naturally managing a portfolio by default, so the for these organizations the question is not the existence of the portfolio, but its composition. The idea that the portfolio must be closely linked to the organization’s strategy, however, is a surprisingly recent one, and has been labeled as the third generation practice in the long history of professional R&D.


The first generation, starting at the very beginnings of systematic R&D in the early decades of industrialism through the mid-1800s, was largely a randomized process of exploring basic science in the hunt for commercial opportunities. Thomas Edison had a more focused approach and it was the prototype for the highly systematized process that was then perfected during World Wars I and II, mission-driven R&D.


Third generation methodology focuses on R&D portfolio management as a key element of organizational strategy, and it is recognized as a standard practice in the world of R&D management. It’s described in the  “Third Generation R&D,” published in 1991, and includes a number of very sophisticated portfolio analysis techniques.


A fourth generation practice of R&D management has also been defined, which expands the scope of the third generation approach with a much greater focus on specific processes for creating breakthrough innovations.


Stages of Innovation Methodology


Every idea is born in its own distinctive moment of inspiration. Many are immediately discarded, while some go through further development pathways.


Effective innovation methodology shapes the pathways by which individual ideas will be developed, and just as important, it’s a broader process which improves the odds that good and great ideas actually do arrive with regularity and that they are developed to their full potential.

Methodology must have means of systematically filtering multitudes of new ideas, applying processes for turning the best ones into candidates for innovations, and using tools to help bring them to market.


So innovation management has five stages at least in converting ideas into successful businesses.

1. Creating or finding great ideas;
2. Targeting, or choosing those worth developing further;
3. Innovation development, transforming great ideas into potential innovations;
4. Applying potential innovations to develop markets and create businesses.
5. Support business till it becomes a success. The innovation team has to debug issues that surface during the actual business transactions.

From Permanent Innovation - Langdon Morris

Permanent Innovation
The Definitive Guide to the Principles, Strategies, and Methods of
Successful Innovators
Langdon Morris

Langdon Morris is a co-founder and principal of InnovationLabs LLC and Senior Practice Scholar at the Ackoff Center of the University of Pennsylvania and Senior Fellow of the Economic Opportunities Program of the Aspen Institute.


Third Generation R&D Management


Third Generation R&D: Managing the Link to Corporate Strategy

Philip A. Roussel, Kamal N. Saad, Tamara J. Erickson
Harvard Business Press, 1991 - 192 pages


Written by three senior consultants from Arthur D. Little,  This book relates how R&D management has evolved from the naive "strategy of hope" approach of the 1950s and 1960s, when companies spent lavishly in the vague expectation that something good would result, to the more systematic approach of the past two decades. The third generation of R&D is a pragmatic method for linking R&D to long-term business planning. It shows managers how to: integrate technology and research capabilities with overall management and strategy; break down organizational barriers that isolate R&D from the rest of the company; foster a spirit of partnership and trust between R&D and other units; and create managed portfolios of R&D projects that match corporate goals.


https://books.google.co.in/books/about/Third_Generation_R_D.html?id=KjwAtPDluusC

A Summary from Arthur D Little
http://www.adlittle.com/downloads/tx_adlprism/1991_q2_01-06.pdf




MBA Core Management Knowledge - One Year Revision Schedule

Updated 26 May 2017, 27 November 2014



May 11, 2017

Organizational Behavior - Revision Articles with Links and Schedule


Organizational Behavior - Revision Articles Based on Fred Luthans Book






12 May

Introduction to Organizational Behavior



May Third Week   15 May to 19 May 2015


Environmental context: Information Technology and Globalization
Environmental context: Diversity and Ethics

Organizational Context: Design and Culture
Organizational Context:: Reward Systems

Perception and Attribution
Personality and Attitudes

Motivational Needs and Processes
Positive Psychology Approach to OB


Communication
Decision Making

Fourth Week  22 May to 26 May 2015



Stress and Conflict
Power and Politics

Groups and Teams
Managing Performance through Job Design and Goal Setting

Behavioral Performance Management
Effective Leadership Process


Great Leaders: Styles, Activities, and Skills






Innovation Management

Principles of Innovation

Innovation - Strategic Issues and Methodology
Idea Generation in Organizations


To June - Management Knowledge Revision


Updated  13 May 2017



Writing on Top Management Challenge Areas - Reflection


Writing on Top Management Challenge Areas for A to Z Blogging Challenge - Reflection





For the April A to Z Blogging Challenge 2017, I wrote on the theme top management challenges. I got an opportunity to think about the issues facing the top management and do literature review regarding the topic. I realize now that I can continue the work on these articles for further and provide a further list of related articles that can be read by interest top managers to develop an understanding of the published literature on the issues identified. Thus I see the potential for studying and enlarging the ideas during the rest of the year. So I am happy that my exercise is a fruitful one.

Index to all articles published

Page views count of each article

I got more than 5000 page views for the articles during the challenge period. I am happy with the page view performance also.

I intend to write next year on the theme Entrepreneurial CEO Characteristics and Activities. The series will use the article "HIRING AN ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADER". By: BUTLER, TIMOTHY. Harvard Business Review. Mar/Apr2017, Vol. 95 Issue 2, p84-93. as the primary resource. The topics are likely to be from the following.

CONSISTENCY or FLEXIBILITY
PROVEN or POTENTIAL
CAREFUL or BOLD
EXPLORE or SETTLE
PREDICTABLE or POSSIBLE
BONUS or SALARY
SAFETY or OPPORTUNITY
MEDAL or JOY
PUZZLE or BLANK CANVAS
NIMBLE or STEADY
CHANGE or CONSTANT
KNOWN or UNKNOWN
PATIENCE or EXCITEMENT
FRONTIER or HOME
SET or OPEN
WILD or TAME
VARIETY or CERTAINTY
INHERIT or CREATE
OWN or MANAGE
SUGGEST or DIRECT
LEAD or PARTICIPATE
SHAPE or CONTROL
CAPTAIN or NAVIGATOR
OWNERSHIP or TITLE
GRACE or POWER
COMPLETE or REFLECT
ASPIRE or ACCOMPLISH
MEMBERSHIP or POSSESSION
KNOWLEDGE or POWER
PRESIDENT or MINISTER
PROFIT or EQUITY

I shall try to collect information and create initial posts and then make the updated posts for the April Challenge.

I thank the A to Z team  Arlee to Zealous participants for creating a network of bloggers and an event for acting and interacting. I intend to participate in the activities of AtoZ Challenge throughout the next year.

May 7, 2017

Business Reimagination - Digital Reimagination


It is the period of business reimagination.

Sometime back we had business process reengineering. Now we have business reimagination. This reimagination is triggered by new digital technologies. It is also being named digital reimagination.


Digital Reimagination

Five key technologies (Digital Five Forces)  are  maturing and  precipitating
the shift to the Digital Consumer Economy. These are Mobility and Pervasive Computing, Big Data,
Social Media, Cloud, and AI-Robotics. These forces are  being used in various permutations
and combinations to drive new applications. As a result, new Digital Composite Forces are emerging.

Foremost among them is the Internet of Things, which combines mobility and pervasive computing,
big data, cloud, and—increasingly—artificial intelligence.

Large number of  devices can be connected to the IoT  driving new economic opportunities. “Digital Reimagination.” involves leveraging a combination of the Digital Five Forces and Digital Composite Forces to reimagine the enterprise along one or more of six dimensions: business models, products and services, customer segments, channels, business processes, and workplaces.
http://info.tcs.com/rs/tcs/images/Report-HBR-ConnectedProducts.pdf
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2016/03/internet-of-things-businessvalue.html

When did the term start.

We are investigating. This 2012 presentation carries lots of examples of changes that occurred in various forms due to digital technologies.

https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2012/06/01/mary-meekers-internet-trends-2012-the-reimagination-of-nearly-everything/


2017 Videos

Lubomira Rochet, Digital Transformation at L'Oreal
____________________

____________________
Said Business School, Oxford University
27 April 2017


The Re-Imagination of Healthcare and What's to Come -- 2013 DHC
December 2013
Moderated by StartUp Health's CEO Steven Krein, this panel of industry experts discusses why there has never been a more exciting time for healthcare innovation and what this means to healthcare ecosystem stakeholders like providers, patients, entrepreneurs, government, corporations, and investors. This forward-looking discussion explores how the Golden Age of Entrepreneurship and Digital Health is creating an innovation landscape in healthcare like we've never seen before.

Moderator: Steven Krein -- Co-Founder and CEO, StartUp Health

Eric Gertler -- Executive Vice President, New York City Economic Development Corporation

Maria Gotsch -- President and CEO, Partnership Fund for New York City

Ryan Olohan -- National Industry Director, Healthcare, Google

Todd Pietri -- General Partner, Milestone Venture Partners

www.DigitalHealthConference.com
www.nyehealth.org

__________________

__________________
NYeHealth


Re-Imagining Work
Published on 25 Sep 2013
Dave Coplin, Chief Envisioning Officer at Microsoft, imagines what might be possible if more organisations embraced the full, empowering potential of technology & encouraged an open, collaborative & flexible working culture. Discover more RSA animations: http://bit.ly/1FKMHGv.
The RSA

__________________

__________________


Become the Digital Transformation Expert in Your Organization -- Top 20 Whitepapers on Digital Transformation
Published on May 9, 2017
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/become-digital-transformation-expert-your-top-20-whitepapers-tang

Number of MBAs in the World



The first MBA was started at  Dartmouth College’s Tuck School 114 years (1904) ago with a four-student class.

In 2011-2012, 191,571 people graduated from U.S. schools with advanced degrees in business, some 25.4% of all the master’s degrees conferred. That compares with 178,062 master’s degrees in education, or 23.6%, of all the advanced degrees.

More than 16 million people in the U.S., roughly 8% of the country's population, now has a master's on his or her resume (2014)


On  July 19 2013,  Financial Times, p. 8, has a report on business schools (Emma Boyde, “A degree of relevance for the 21st C.?”   p. 8).   According to FT,    there are 15,673 institutions worldwide offering business degrees at all levels.    Basically, America invented the MBA.  In 2011-12,  some 156,400 students were enrolled in US MBA programs.

 



For detailed reading

http://fortune.com/2014/05/31/mba-popular-masters-degree/

https://timnovate.wordpress.com/2013/07/17/too-many-mbas-in-the-world/



India

April 2016
India has at least 5,500 B-schools in operation now.
In 2015-16, these schools offered a total of 5,20,000 seats in MBA courses, compared to 3,60,000 in 2011-12.


January 2015
According to AICTE, the number of management institutions have risen from 2,614 in 2006-07 to 3,364 in 2013-14.
According to All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), 3,54,421 students enrolled for MBA in 3,364 institutions across the country last year.


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/industry/services/education/out-of-three-lakh-mba-graduates-every-year-only-10-are-employable-experts/articleshow/45867352.cms

http://www.assocham.org/newsdetail.php?id=5651

May 4, 2017

Principles of Management - Subject Update


Basic Chapter Summaries of Principles of Management Based on Koontz and O'Donnell's Book


May 2017

How to Retain Employees Through 'Servant' Leadership
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/289730


April 2017

By studying and writing on Principles of Management, I became the original author of Principles of Industrial Engineering, a Management Subject with foundation in engineering.

Basic and Detailed Principles of Industrial Engineering
http://nraoiekc.blogspot.com/2016/07/basic-principles-of-industrial.html


March 2017

Leaders have to manage the current activity to change it to make it better

http://www.managementexchange.com/story/first-line-manager-leaders-must-manager-lead



March 2016

Seven Quality management principles (QMPs) 

by ISO  - Read them compulsorily if you have not read so far.
http://www.iso.org/iso/pub100080.pdf

One of the definitions of a “principle” is that it is a basic belief, theory or rule that has a major influence on the way in which something is done. “Quality management principles” are a set
of fundamental beliefs, norms, rules and values that are accepted as true and can be used as a basis for quality management.

The QMPs can be used as a foundation to guide an organization’s performance improvement. They were developed and updated by international experts of ISO/TC 176, which is responsible for
developing and maintaining ISO’s quality management standards.


The seven quality management principles



QMP 1 – Customer focus
QMP 2 – Leadership
QMP 3 – Engagement of people
QMP 4 – Process approach
QMP 5 – Improvement
QMP 6 – Evidence-based decision making
QMP 7 – Relationship management


These principles are not listed in priority order.  All are important and the relative importance
of each principle will vary from organization to organization and can be expected to change over time in the same organization.

Seven Principles of Supply Chain Management


Principle 1: Segment customers based on the ser­vice needs of distinct groups and adapt the supply chain to serve these segments profitably.

Principle 2: Customize the logistics network to the service requirements and profitability of customer segments.

Principle 3: Listen to market signals and align demand planning accordingly across the supply chain, ensuring consistent forecasts and optimal resource allocation

Principle 4: Differentiate product closer to the customer and speed conversion across the supply chain

Principle 5: Manage sources of supply strategically to reduce the total cost of owning materials and services

Principle 6: Develop a supply chain-wide technology strategy that supports multiple levels of decision making and gives a clear view of the flow of products, services, and information

Principle 7: Adopt channel-spanning performance measures to gauge collective success in reaching the end-user effectively and efficiently
http://www.supplychain247.com/paper/the_7_principles_of_supply_chain_management

Seven Principles of Change Management


Senders and Receivers
Resistance
Authority for Change
Value Systems
Incremental vs. Radical Change
The Right Answer Is Not Enough
Change Is a Process
https://www.prosci.com/change-management/thought-leadership-library/the-seven-principles-of-change-management


The APICS Principles of Operations Management consists of five classroom-based, instructor-led courses.

         The Principles of Inventory Management

         The Principles of Operations Planning

         The Principles of Manufacturing Management

         The Principles of Distribution and Logistics

         The Principles of Managing Operations


A HBR article on Negotiation
https://hbr.org/2003/10/nice-girls-dont-ask/

Free Open Access Book

http://open.lib.umn.edu/principlesmanagement/


TENDENCIES IN EVOLUTION OF 21ST CENTURY
MANAGEMENT
https://www.efst.hr/management/Vol20-Specissue/1-Buble%20-%20Management%20tendencies.pdf

THE PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL INNOVATIONS IN MODERN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION.
Source: In the World of Scientific Discoveries / V Mire Nauchnykh Otkrytiy . 2014, Vol. 60 Issue 11.11, p4244-4261. 18p.
Author(s): Danakin, N. S.; Shutenko, A. I.; Ospishchev, P. I.

Developing a Theory and Philosophy of Management
Chapter 1 of Pearson Book
https://www.pearsonhighered.com/assets/hip/us/hip_us_pearsonhighered/samplechapter/0205088155.pdf


November 2015

Innovation Excellence requires Ambidextrous Management
http://www.innovationexcellence.com/blog/2015/11/12/innovation-requires-ambidextrous-management/


September 2015
New and Updated articles in area

Systems Approach in Management - Very detailed treatment is now posted
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2014/12/systems-approach-in-approach.html

Execution is an important function of management

Planning and Execution - Theory and Practice
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2015/09/planning-and-execution-theory-and.html

Resourcing is an important activity for all managers to accomplish set goals

http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2012/03/resourcing-function-of-management.html


May 2015

Negotiation: What Makes the Right Business Deal
http://www.forbes.com/sites/ianaltman/2015/05/05/negotiation-what-makes-the-right-business-deal/





Get the Boss to Buy In.

By: Ashford, Susan J.; Detert, James. Harvard Business Review. Jan/Feb2015, Vol. 93 Issue 1/2, p72-79.

Middle managers  gather valuable intelligence from direct contact with customers, suppliers, and colleagues; they can often see when the market is ripe for a certain offering, for instance, or spot signs that a partnership won't work. But in a top-down culture, they may not voice their ideas and concerns -- and even when they do, they often struggle to persuade the people at the top.


The authors suggest that middle managers should tailor their pitch to the goals, values, and knowledge of decision makers; frame the issue to show how it supports a strategic goal; manage emotions (their own and their audience's); get the timing right by, say, attending to a boss's preoccupations or watching larger trends; involve others, both in and out of their networks; and  adhere to organizational norms, such as how leaders prefer to receive information.


MANAGING YOUR MISSION-CRITICAL KNOWLEDGE.

By: IHRIG, MARTIN; MACMILLAN, IAN. Harvard Business Review. Jan/Feb2015, Vol. 93 Issue 1/2, p80-87. 8p. 2 Color Photographs, 2 Diagrams.

Large-scale, sustainable growth is  possible when people take insights from one knowledge domain and apply them in another -- when deep technical expertise in one business unit is applied in a different business unit, for example, or when a best-in-class marketing group pulls a product development unit into the 21st century by sharing market insights gleaned from customer data.

The authors describe how to map your organization's strategic knowledge.  When knowledge assets are placed in a grid along two dimensions -- unstructured (tacit) versus structured (explicit) and undiffused (restricted) versus diffused (shared) -- it becomes easier to manage them for future competitive advantage.





Playbook - AMA NET

Interesting Source for Management Articles
http://playbook.amanet.org/

Managing Power Dynamics in International Negotiations
BY YADVINDER RANA
About The Author: Yadvinder S. Rana is Professor of Cultural Management at the Catholic University in Milan, Italy, lecturer on intercultural negotiation and influence in leading international business schools, and founder of Neglob, a management consultancy firm that assists companies in international negotiations and global teams performance improvement. For more information about Rana and his new book, The 4Ps Framework: Advanced Negotiation and Influence Strategies for Global Effectiveness, please visit www.neglob.com.
http://playbook.amanet.org/managing-power-dynamics-in-international-negotiations/




The New Rules of Motivation: Unleash Employee Reciprocity
BY RODD WAGNER
About The Author: Rodd Wagner is the New York Times bestselling author of the new book Widgets: The 12 New Rules for Managing Your Employees As If They’re Real People (McGraw-Hill, April 2015).
http://playbook.amanet.org/the-new-rules-of-motivation-unleash-employee-reciprocity/

Only 10% are great managers.
Around 35% OK.
http://www.fastcoexist.com/3044630/this-may-not-surprise-you-only-10-of-managers-have-what-it-takes-to-be-managers



Principles of Management - Subject Update - 2014


Updated 7 May 2017,  8 April 2017,   12 March 2017, 26 Mar 2016, 16 Feb 2016, 11 Dec 2015